User:X-Factor/sandbox

From RationalWiki
< User:X-Factor(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Hentai)
Line 2: Line 2:
  
 
According to Urban Dictionary, Webster's street smart internet cousin and the premier source for the latest burns and slams, a '''STEMlord''' is a pejorative term for a particular kind of person who has studied in these areas at university or works in these fields who holds a pretentious, condescending attitude to anyone who has studied in any other fields, particularly the Arts and Humanities. They typically believe themselves to be more "intelligent" and "rational", while generally remaining incredibly ignorant outside of their areas of expertise and having the charisma of a rotting pig's backside. The phrase is most likely derived from the Doctor Who's seemingly omniscient Time Lords but without the social science skills needed to navigate even the history section of the local library, or the ability to articulate social concerns needed to be considered either a Social Justice Warrior or Men's Rights Advocate. <ref> [http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=STEMlord Urbandictionary] </ref>
 
According to Urban Dictionary, Webster's street smart internet cousin and the premier source for the latest burns and slams, a '''STEMlord''' is a pejorative term for a particular kind of person who has studied in these areas at university or works in these fields who holds a pretentious, condescending attitude to anyone who has studied in any other fields, particularly the Arts and Humanities. They typically believe themselves to be more "intelligent" and "rational", while generally remaining incredibly ignorant outside of their areas of expertise and having the charisma of a rotting pig's backside. The phrase is most likely derived from the Doctor Who's seemingly omniscient Time Lords but without the social science skills needed to navigate even the history section of the local library, or the ability to articulate social concerns needed to be considered either a Social Justice Warrior or Men's Rights Advocate. <ref> [http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=STEMlord Urbandictionary] </ref>
 +
 +
= Hentai =
 +
 +
The term hentai was first used in the middle of the Meiji period in the context of the developing science of psychology to describe disorders such as hysteria as well as to refer to paranormal abilities such as telepathy and hypnosis. It had the connotation of something outside or beyond the normal. <ref> Saitō Hikaru, 'Hentai-H,' in Sei no yōgoshū, ed. Kansai seiyoku kenkyūkai, Tokyo: Kōdansha gendaishinsho, 2004, pp. 45-58. </ref>
 +
 +
The notion of hentai seiyoku or perverse or abnormal sexual desire was popularised via the translation of German sexologist Krafft-Ebing's text Psychopathia Sexualis which was given the Japanese title Hentai seiyoku shinrigaku [The psychology of perverse sexual desires]. Although the term seiyoku (sexual desire) at first only circulated among medical specialists, its wider dissemination was accelerated by the use of the term in fiction by writers. <ref> Takayuki Yokota-Murakami, Don Juan East/West: on the Problematics of Comparative Literature, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1998. </ref> It was perversion, not normality, that was obsessively enumerated in popular sexology texts, thus giving 'the impression not only that "perversion" was ubiquitous, but that the connotations of the term were not entirely negative. <ref> Gregory Pflugfelder, Cartographies of Desire: Male-Male Sexuality in Japanese Discourse, 1600-1950, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999, p. 287. </ref>
 +
 +
Public interest in perversity fed demand for increasingly detailed and lurid descriptions, and 'what started out as prescriptive literature quickly lost the blessings of educators and police and thus descended into the underground culture. With increased state censorship gearing up for war in the 1930s, this genre came under increased scrutiny and publication was largely suspended from about 1933 due to paper rationing.  <ref> Donald Roden, 'Taisho Culture and the Problem of Gender Ambivalence', in Japanese Intellectuals during the Inter-War Years, ed. J. Thomas Rimer, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990, p. 46. </ref>
 +
 +
==External links==
 +
 +
[http://www.cjas.org/~leng/amrc.htm Anime and Manga Research Council]
  
 
=Jihad Watch=
 
=Jihad Watch=

Revision as of 03:54, 20 May 2017

Contents

STEMlord

According to Urban Dictionary, Webster's street smart internet cousin and the premier source for the latest burns and slams, a STEMlord is a pejorative term for a particular kind of person who has studied in these areas at university or works in these fields who holds a pretentious, condescending attitude to anyone who has studied in any other fields, particularly the Arts and Humanities. They typically believe themselves to be more "intelligent" and "rational", while generally remaining incredibly ignorant outside of their areas of expertise and having the charisma of a rotting pig's backside. The phrase is most likely derived from the Doctor Who's seemingly omniscient Time Lords but without the social science skills needed to navigate even the history section of the local library, or the ability to articulate social concerns needed to be considered either a Social Justice Warrior or Men's Rights Advocate. [1]

Hentai

The term hentai was first used in the middle of the Meiji period in the context of the developing science of psychology to describe disorders such as hysteria as well as to refer to paranormal abilities such as telepathy and hypnosis. It had the connotation of something outside or beyond the normal. [2]

The notion of hentai seiyoku or perverse or abnormal sexual desire was popularised via the translation of German sexologist Krafft-Ebing's text Psychopathia Sexualis which was given the Japanese title Hentai seiyoku shinrigaku [The psychology of perverse sexual desires]. Although the term seiyoku (sexual desire) at first only circulated among medical specialists, its wider dissemination was accelerated by the use of the term in fiction by writers. [3] It was perversion, not normality, that was obsessively enumerated in popular sexology texts, thus giving 'the impression not only that "perversion" was ubiquitous, but that the connotations of the term were not entirely negative. [4]

Public interest in perversity fed demand for increasingly detailed and lurid descriptions, and 'what started out as prescriptive literature quickly lost the blessings of educators and police and thus descended into the underground culture. With increased state censorship gearing up for war in the 1930s, this genre came under increased scrutiny and publication was largely suspended from about 1933 due to paper rationing. [5]

External links

Anime and Manga Research Council

Jihad Watch

Jihad Watch is a blog affiliated with the David Horowitz Freedom Center, run by blogger Robert SpencerWikipedia's W.svg,[6][7][8][9][10] it has been described as one of the main homes of the Counter-jihad movement on the internet.[11]

According to the website, a theology of violent jihad, which denies non-Muslims and women equality, human rights, and dignity has been present throughout the history of Islam. Jihad Watch says that it is "dedicated to bringing public attention to the role that jihad theology and ideology plays in the modern world, and to correct popular misconceptions about the role of jihad and religion in modern-day conflicts."[12]

It has been repeatedly criticised by numerous academics who believe that it promotes an Islamophobic worldview and conspiracy theories.[13][14][15][16][17][18]

Jihad Watch has been criticized for its portrayal of Islam as a totalitarian political doctrine,[13] and as such has been accused of Islamophobia.[14][15][16][17][18]

The Council on American–Islamic Relations (CAIR) called Jihad Watch an "Internet hate site" and said it is "notorious for its depiction of Islam as an inherently violent faith that is a threat to world peace."[citation needed] The Guardian writer Brian Whitaker described Jihad Watch as a "notoriously Islamophobic website",[19] while other critics such as Dinesh D'Souza,[20] Karen Armstrong,[21] and Cathy Young,[22] pointed to what they see as "deliberate mischaracterizations" of Islam and Muslims by Spencer as inherently violent and therefore prone to terrorism. Spencer has denied such criticism.[23]

Benazir Bhutto, the late Pakistani Prime Minister, in her book Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West, wrote that Spencer uses Jihad Watch to spread misinformation and hatred of Islam. She added that he presents a skewed, one-sided, and inflammatory story that only helps to sow the seed of civilizational conflict.[24]

Robert Spencer has been described by some civil rights organizations including the Southern Poverty Law Center[25] and Anti-Defamation League[26] as a “hate group leader.”

Response to criticism

Spencer has responded to accusations that Jihad Watch is Islamophobic by saying that the term "Islamophobe" is "a tool used by Islamic apologists to silence criticism."[23] He says that his work is:
... dedicated to identifying the causes of jihad terrorism, which of course lead straight back into the Islamic texts. I have therefore called for reform of those texts... I have dedicated Jihad Watch to defending equality of rights and freedom of conscience for all people. That's Islamophobic? Then is the fault in the phobe, or in the Islam?[23]
  1. Urbandictionary
  2. Saitō Hikaru, 'Hentai-H,' in Sei no yōgoshū, ed. Kansai seiyoku kenkyūkai, Tokyo: Kōdansha gendaishinsho, 2004, pp. 45-58.
  3. Takayuki Yokota-Murakami, Don Juan East/West: on the Problematics of Comparative Literature, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1998.
  4. Gregory Pflugfelder, Cartographies of Desire: Male-Male Sexuality in Japanese Discourse, 1600-1950, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999, p. 287.
  5. Donald Roden, 'Taisho Culture and the Problem of Gender Ambivalence', in Japanese Intellectuals during the Inter-War Years, ed. J. Thomas Rimer, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990, p. 46.
  6. Robert Spencer Joins the David Horowitz Freedom Center, FrontPage Magazine, September 6, 2006
  7. ROBERT SPENCER Page at Jihadwatch.
  8. Glenn Beck Transcript, CNN, August 10, 2006
  9. Glenn Beck Transcript, CNN, October 23, 2006
  10. Invitation to author upsets Muslims, Indianapolis Star, March 18, 2007 |url=https://web.archive.org/web/20070928040356/http://www.muslimalliancein.com/mai/enews_brief_mar26.htm |date=September 28, 2007 }}
  11. Hegghammer, Thomas (24 July 2011). "The Rise of the Macro-Nationalists". The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/31/opinion/sunday/the-rise-of-the-macro-nationalists.html?_r=1. Retrieved 30 July 2011. 
  12. "Jihad Watch". Jihad Watch. March 28, 2010. http://www.jihadwatch.org/why-jihad-watch.html. Retrieved April 1, 2010. 
  13. 13.0 13.1 Arun Kundnani (June 2012). "Blind Spot? Security Narratives and Far-Right Violence in Europe" (pdf). International Centre for Counter-terrorism. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  14. 14.0 14.1 John L. Esposito (2011). "Islamophobia and the Challenges of Pluralism in the 21st Century - Introduction". Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, Georgetown University. http://www12.georgetown.edu/sfs/docs/ACMCU_Islamophobia_txt_99.pdf. Retrieved 2012-08-27. 
  15. 15.0 15.1 Ismael, Tareq Y.; Rippin, Andrew, eds (2010). Islam in the Eyes of the West: Images and Realities in an Age of Terror. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 0-415-56414-X.  cited from Webb, E. (2012). "Review of Tareq Y. Ismael & Andrew Rippin (eds.), Islam in the Eyes of the West: Images and Realities in an Age of Terror". Contemporary Islam. 
  16. 16.0 16.1 D'Annibale, Valerie Scatamburlo-D’, ed (2011). "Campus Cons and the New Mccarthyism". Cold Breezes and Idiot Winds. Rotterdam: SensePublishers. ISBN 978-9460914072. 
  17. 17.0 17.1 Varisco, D. M. (2009). "Muslims and the media in the blogosphere". Contemporary Islam 4: 157–177. 
  18. 18.0 18.1 Topal, S. (2011). "Everybody Wants Secularism—But Which One? Contesting Definitions of Secularism in Contemporary Turkey". International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 25: 1–3. 
  19. Drawn conclusions, The Guardian, February 7, 2006
  20. Dinesh D'Souza (March 2, 2007). "Letting Bin Laden Define Islam". http://newsbloggers.aol.com/2007/03/02/letting-bin-laden-define-islam/. 
  21. "Balancing the Prophet". Financial Times. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/4a05a4a4-f134-11db-838b-000b5df10621.html. 
  22. "The Jihad Against Muslims". http://www.reason.com/news/show/36677.html. 
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 "Wikipedia and Robert Spencer". http://www.jihadwatch.org/2008/03/wikipedia-and-robert-spencer.html. Retrieved March 25, 2008. 
  24. Benazir Bhutto, Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West, Harper, 2008, p.245-6
  25. "Muslim Basher Robert Spencer Shows White Nationalist Colors". http://www.splcenter.org/blog/2011/11/09/muslim-basher-robert-spencer-shows-white-nationalist-colors/. Retrieved 16 April 2017. 
  26. "Stop Islamization of America (SIOA)". http://www.adl.org/civil-rights/discrimination/c/stop-islamization-of-america.html. Retrieved 16 April 2017. 
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools