Aphorism

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
We control what
you think with

Language
Icon language.svg
Said and done
Jargon, buzzwords, slogans

An Aphorism is a form of communication that is intended to be easily memorized, generally word for word and most often have some pithy religious or philosophical comment on the world.

Several examples include: "Let those who have ears, hear" -- Jesus "In nature, there are neither rewards nor punishments — there are consequences."

Almost every aphorism has an opposite aphorism. This is taught in basic communication courses. Most people still find them clever though.

Aphorisms in politics[edit]

Aphorisms are often overused when candidates compete for votes. One could easily imagine a debate between two presidential nominees sounding something like this:

  • McCain: Look before you leap.
  • Obama: He who hesitates is lost.
  • McCain: Clothes make the man.
  • Obama: Never judge a book by its cover.
  • McCain: When in Rome do as the Romans do.
  • Obama: To thine own self be true.
  • McCain: Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
  • Obama: Out of sight, out of mind.
  • McCain: Better safe than sorry.
  • Obama: Nothing ventured, nothing gained
  • McCain: The more the merrier.
  • Obama: Two's company three's a crowd.
  • McCain: It's never too late to learn.
  • Obama: You can't teach an old dog new tricks.
  • McCain: Has the cat got your tongue?
  • Obama: Don't let the cat out of the bag.
  • McCain: Let sleeping dogs lie.
  • Obama: Leave no stone unturned.
  • McCain: I know you are but what am I...
  • Obama: I am rubber you are glue....