RationalWiki will be going through an upgrade cycle this weekend. This will cause some down time, details are at the tech blog. As a reminder, we try and add information to the tech blog during any outage, you can always refer to it for details or as a form of communication if the site is down.

from Tmtoulouse (Talk), group Site wide (urgent) at 15:23, 18 April 2014

Bronze-level articleHomeschooling

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Homeschooling is just what it sounds like – children are schooled at home, usually by their parents. Sometimes parents from two or more families will share the duties of schooling their children. This is done to access the strengths of each parent as a teacher – one may be a mathematics whiz, another may be an English major, and so on.

Contents

[edit] Collective homeschooling and the fight against government regulation and oversight

Homeschool classes aren't necessarily just one child being schooled at home by their parents. For instance, Andrew Schlafly, the son of anti-feminist political activist Phyllis Schlafly, has around 58 in his homeschooled history class. If you are wondering how one man could accumulate 58 "homeschooled" students, the answer goes by the term collective homeschooling. That is, students gather at the home of a parent/teacher for class. Usually, such people are defined as private tutors - a job title that requires a teacher's certificate in most states. Homeschool advocates constantly fight against all such government efforts to regulate homeschooling, including:

  • Accreditation of all homeschool programs.
  • Certification of parent/teachers, including those who teach other people's children.
  • Oversight of curricula and teaching materials.
  • Requirements that any home or other building used for collective homeschooling carry extra insurance to reflect its use as a school facility.

[edit] The teachers

The most common model for homeschooling requires one parent (guess which one) to stay home with the kids and teach them from books specifically designed for homeschooling. This means that "home school parents are, by definition, more heavily involved in their children's education [than] public or private school parents. Home schools can easily pace and adapt their curriculum; public and private schools typically have a mandated scope and sequence."[1]

Homeschooling parent/teachers are not held to the same standards as public school teachers in various US states (for example New Jersey). While many have college degrees, those degrees may lack any relevance to a child's school curriculum (business administration, theology, basket-weaving, for example). But as long as their children/students pass standardized tests, few people raise questions about this disparity.

Despite this, studies in the USA (which mention in their very abstract that they are not controlled experiments, and also note that homeschooling parents tend to be far more affluent than average) demonstrate that "at every grade level, the mean performance of home school students whose parents do not have a college degree is still much higher than the mean performance of students taught in public schools."[1] In fact, "having at least one parent who is a certified teacher appears to have no significant effect on the achievement levels of home schooled students. The test scores of students whose parents had ever held a teaching certificate were only three percentile points higher than those whose parents had not — in the 88th percentile versus the 85th percentile."[citation needed]

[edit] The homeschool industry

People who question the claim that "the homeschooling industry has such a lock on the information about homeschooling" will have it tough to find anything but positive feedback. (After reading some of it, you might think "propaganda" is more accurate.) If you enter the word "homeschooling" into a search engine, followed by words like "myths," "horror stories," "cons," etc., you will be greeted by hundreds of links dispelling myths, horror stories and cons as lies. Websites with legitimate stories about the negatives of homeschooling are almost impossible to find. This lack of critical information has raised questions among those seeking information about homeschooling.

[edit] Other reasons for homeschooling

There are various reasons to accept homeschooling aside from being a far-right religious nutter. Some parents may pursue careers in which they are rarely settled in one location, such as career military officers and touring musicians, and find homeschooling their children to be more practical than enrolling them permanently in a school.

In other cases the reasons are determined by the interests or abilities of the child. For example, parents who believe their child to be especially gifted, or wish them to be, may feel that the child could not reach their full potential in a public (or even private) school, and instead educate them, often intensively, at home. Some are "child prodigies" with a particular skill, such as musicianship or athletics. These inevitably take a lot of practise time, and cannot easily fit around a school schedule. Sometimes these children, or their parents, have little interest in pursuing other educational studies. Similarly, a child may be more interested in learning a craft than in pursuing an academic education. However, if the majority of homeschooling time is given over to a particular subject, the child may miss out on a balanced general education, which could disadvantage them later in life.

In a few cases, a student's reasons for being homeschooled may relate to negative or traumatic experiences in a school environment, such as bullying or even assault, leaving them feeling that they are unable to return to school.

In England and Wales, the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) lists the following common grounds for parents to choose homeschooling ("elective home education", in DCSF parlance):

  • Distance or access to a local school
  • Religious or cultural beliefs
  • Philosophical or ideological views
  • Dissatisfaction with the system
  • Bullying in school
  • As a short term intervention for a particular reason
  • A child’s unwillingness or inability to go to school
  • Special educational needs
  • Parents’ desire for a closer relationship with their children

[edit] Homeskool kid makes good!

Homeschooled kids often win contests such as spelling bees and math contests. However, it's unclear how typical these few prize winners are among the total population of homeschooled students. For instance, because many of today's homeschooling materials are Bible-centric,[2] it's a sure bet that most homeschool science education lacks any real value. The Biology Blue Ribbon at the science fair isn't likely to go to a child who makes a diorama of Adam riding a dinosaur.

It is also quite possible that these shining examples of success come from other groups besides fundamentalist Christians who homeschool: those hippy types who don't want their children indoctrinated by "the establishment" to become capitalist tools (note the irony), or parents who feel that they can provide better facilities for their gifted or otherwise special-needs children. For example, disorders on the autism spectrum are sometimes associated with increased ability with mathematics or memory, the skills tested in math and spelling competitions. Since children with autism often have difficulty with social situations, their parents may homeschool them in order to give them a good education without forcing them into the often difficult social environment of a public school, while their natural abilities lead them to win these competitions. Also, there is much less of a need for a balanced education in for a homeschooled child, so they can focus an inordinate amount of time on something of little actual educational value, such as learning how to spell obscure words.

[edit] An actual homeschool

For an example of an actual homeschool and the things that it teaches, take a look at Alpha Omega Academy. AOA is accredited, and on the surface seems to have a perfectly viable (if overtly religious) curriculum.

However, look beneath the shiny exterior and you'll find that students at AOA are being taught to believe that science is wrong when it doesn't agree with the Bible. The biology curriculum is informed by the work of Ken Ham, asserting that the Earth *must* be 6,000 years old, or reinforcing the usual anti-evolution rhetoric.

Oh, yeah, plus racism.

Topics like history and English are taught in the most bare-bones fashion possible while still maintaining the same religiosity that you see in science classes. A Bible class is required to graduate from the school, and health class is handled about as well as you'd expect it to be.

The online nature of the school, combined with the isolationist mindset of many parents who homeschool their children, means that many of the students have limited social contact, which makes it difficult for them learn how to question their beliefs (or their education), retards the development of critical thinking, and makes it difficult for them to get help if they realize that they are being denied a decent education or experiencing other forms of abuse.

[edit] Secular homeschooling

While the representation of homeschooling in this article focuses on those parents who are not rational and intelligent freethinkers with adequate university degrees. Those who decide to homeschool their child adequately (because public and private schools are largely a waste of time for gifted children) while providing ample opportunity for the child to socialize and not be a maladjusted freak. Those cases are rare, however, so it's dubious whether the question merits much, or any, attention.

[edit] See also

[edit] External links

[edit] Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rudner, Lawrence M., Ph.D. "The Scholastic Achievement and Demographic Characteristics of Home School Students in 1998". Education Policy Analysis Archives. Volume 7 Number 8 March 23, 1999. ISSN 1068-2341 Retrieved 17 March 2009.
  2. Many homeschooling resource websites have areas dedicated to Bible studies. Four such examples [1] [2] [3]
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Community
Tools
support