Information icon.svg Please vote in the 2017 board of trustees election. The cabal thanks you for your service.

Kary Mullis

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
If the Nobel disease had a poster boy.
The woo is out there
UFOlogy
Icon ufology.svg
Aliens did it...
... and ran away
Not just a river in Egypt
Denialism
Icon denialism.svg
♫ We're not listening ♫
Once he turned on the lights and left sacks of groceries on the floor, he lighted his path to the outhouse with a flashlight. On the way, he saw something glowing under a fir tree. Shining the flashlight on this glow, it seemed to be a raccoon with little black eyes. The raccoon spoke, saying, ‘Good evening, doctor,’ and he replied with a hello.
—You read that correctly. We are not kidding.[1]

Kary Mullis (born 1944) is a Nobel prize-winning biochemist, best known for developing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), unquestionably one of the most important tools in molecular biology.

Unfortunately, he has a number of less-founded views that he publicly expounds upon.

Where's the beef?[edit]

Given that he has claimed that his LSD use had a major role in his work on PCR (James Watson, the discoverer of DNA, notably made similar claims with respect to his development of DNA as a concept prior to empirically confirming it),[2] it is perhaps unsurprising that he holds a number of bizarre views on subjects outside his specialty, and is noted for endorsing various and sundry conspiracy theories and pseudosciences.

Crank views[edit]

See the main article on this topic: Nobel disease

To name a few:

AIDS Denialism
Mullis pals around with noted AIDS denialist Peter Duesberg and believes AIDS is a conspiracy involving the government, scientists, and environmentalists.[3]
Alien abduction
Mullis claims he has had an encounter with an extraterrestrial being, in which he denies the involvement of LSD. More specifically — he reported having close contact with a glowing green raccoon at his cabin in the woods of northern California around midnight one night in 1985. No, really.[1]
Aliensdidit
Mullis sees evidence of Urantia Book scientific foreknowledge, writing "Several scientific developments, unexpected in 1955, reported in 2005 in Science and Nature […] were somehow described rather precisely already in the Urantia Book."[4]
Astrology[5]
Climate change denialism[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bullard, Thomas, "The Myth and Mystery of UFOs", LRB (Review) (UK) 33 (22)
  2. Mullis on LSD
  3. If you want to know what the environmentalists have to do with it, you'll have to read his book, Dancing Naked in the Mind Field.
  4. Seriously.
  5. 5.0 5.1 NYT: Bright Scientists, Dim Notions