Campaign!

G'day, fellow RationalWikians! Don't forget to visit the Campaign page of the 2016 Board of trustees election in order to make your voice heard. Suggested activities include:

  • Endorsing select candidates (lending a hand to your loyal henchmen and/or glorious overlords!)
  • Anti-endorsing select candidates (character-assassinating your hated opponents!)
  • Providing moar goat (please wipe afterwards)
  • Just asking questions to the candidates

Your participation might help other users better direct their votes. More importantly, it'll show the world that we've yet to go full Citizendium in terms of election hype!

from FuzzyCatPotato (Talk), group Site wide (urgent) at 00:24, 25 July 2016

Redemption movement

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
I fought the law
and the law won

Pseudolaw

Icon pseudolaw.svg
To convolute
and distort

The redemption movement is a pseudolegal conspiracy theory and fraud scheme[1] that can be best described as sovereign citizen quackery meets gold standard quackery.

Contents

[edit] History

The notion originated in the US with white supremacist Roger Elvick, who pushed it through the 1980s and early 1990s.

[edit] The central tenets

The conspiracy holds that, it was not replaced with fiat currency, but instead replaced with a bizarre system in which each citizen (as opposed to a national, who are supposedly the actual people that exist) is actually legal fiction held as a collateral worth the oddly specific amount of $630,000; this is then somehow used to give money its value. The exact date in which this system was supposedly established varies from crank to crank; some hold that it occurred when the US government abandoned the gold standard in 1933, but others establish this date to have been in 1913 with the formation of the Federal Reserve.

[edit] How does it (not) work?

Elvick believed that the government deposits exactly $630,000 into a hidden bank account linked to the newborn American and administered by a Jewish cabal.

Its promoters claim that should the correct magical legal manoeuvres and incantations be performed, it is possible to redeem (hence the name of the movement) the $630,000 held in the name of the doppelgänger persona, and that after filing the correct paperwork at the courthouse declaring oneself a sovereign citizen, one's home loans and other debts can be paid in full by tendering a "sight draft" or "bill of exchange" in the name of the U.S. Treasury.

[edit] Results of actually trying to apply this in a court of law

As with all pseudolaw, attempting to put any of this into practice will assure that the user will have a bad time. At the very best, a claimant can be fined for attempting to produce this conspiracy's arguments for, quite frankly, wasting the Internal Revenue Service's time[2]; at worst, pushers of this quackery can be convicted of fraud.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

[edit] Legacy

While it has since largely died since Roger Elvick was convicted of criminal conspiracy and (shockingly) tax evasion, the basic tenets of the movement lived on to plague the virtuous. Since then, it has spawned several similar "nuh-uh the government can't control me and taxation is theft" groups. The only two ones that gained any traction are the freeman on the land movement (which claims that similar birth bonds exist in Canada, the UK and Australia and that citizenship is just legal fiction) and the sovereign citizen movement (which ditches any pretence of being about anything that isn't paying taxes).

[edit] Footnotes

  1. "Common Fraud Schemes". fbi.gov. Federal Bureau of Investigation. https://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud/fraud#rsbf. Retrieved 27 February 2016. 
  2. 26 U.S. Code § 6702 - Frivolous tax submissions. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/26/6702
  3. United States v. Anderson, 353 F.3d 490 (6th Cir. 2003), at [1].
  4. United States v. Dykstra, 991 F.2d 450 (8th Cir. 1993), at [2].
  5. United States v. Hildebrandt, 961 F.2d 116 (8th Cir. 1992), at [3].
  6. United States v. Rosnow, 9 F.3d 728 (8th Cir. 1993), at [4].
  7. United States v. Salman, 531 F.3d 1007 (9th Cir. 2008), at [5].
  8. United States v. Wiley, 979 F.2d 365 (5th Cir. 1992), at [6].
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools