Campaign!

G'day, fellow RationalWikians! Don't forget to visit the Campaign page of the 2016 Board of trustees election in order to make your voice heard. Suggested activities include:

  • Endorsing select candidates (lending a hand to your loyal henchmen and/or glorious overlords!)
  • Anti-endorsing select candidates (character-assassinating your hated opponents!)
  • Providing moar goat (please wipe afterwards)
  • Just asking questions to the candidates

Your participation might help other users better direct their votes. More importantly, it'll show the world that we've yet to go full Citizendium in terms of election hype!

from FuzzyCatPotato (Talk), group Site wide (urgent) at 00:24, 25 July 2016

Whale.to

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Some dare call it

Conspiracy

Icon conspiracy.svg
What THEY don't want
you to know!
Sheeple wakers

Whale.to is a webshite which contains every (and we do mean every) half-baked pseudoscientific woo and conspiracy theory ever concocted. It is run by English pig farmer John Scudamore.[1] Scudamore has a long history of trying to insert links to his website on Wikipedia under the username Whaleto, but a few years ago this was put to an end when someone added whale.to to a spam block list. This means no one can link to it in any Wikipedia article, which led to Scudamore whining about being suppressed (obviously) by the "Church of Satan."[2] It is a notorious dumping ground for all things pseudoscientific... as well as a few other things. Like the complete text of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, documentations of Illuminati mind control plots, and articles about the Catholic world conspiracy.[3]

Contents

[edit] Scopie's Law

See the main article on this topic: Genetic fallacy#Bayesian exception

Scopie's Law states:

In any discussion involving science or medicine, citing Whale.to as a credible source loses you the argument immediately... and gets you laughed out of the room.

It was first formulated by Rich Scopie on the Bad Science forum.[4]

[edit] Cite-ers

Shockingly, it was used as a source by the plaintiffs in the Autism omnibus trial, and it has seen increasing use as a "source" by anti-vaccinationists and propagators of the vaccine-autism "connection" (which should be a clue right there to the validity of their claims).[citation needed]

NaturalNews is itself known to violate Scopie's Law and cite Whale.to on numerous occasions.[5]

[edit] See also

[edit] External links

[edit] Footnotes

  1. Stacy Mintzer Herlihy and E. Allison Hagood. Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives. Lanham, MD: Roman and Littlefield, 2012.
  2. Caution.
  3. A Whale of an Expert, Neurodiversity. 13 June 2008.
  4. See the original post here. This post was cited by Orac of Respectful Insolence as the first mention of the law.
  5. Five times in this article alone.
Articles on RationalWiki about Eponymous laws
  Badger's Law  -  Danth's Law  -  Feminist internet laws  -  Godwin's Law  -  Gore's Law  -  Haggard's Law  -  Haig's Law  -  Internet law  -  List of Poe's Law examples  -  Loi de Poe  -  Murphy's Law  -  Poe's Law  -  Rove's Law  
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools