Draft:TRS spray

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a draft that anyone is free to edit as they would a mainspace page.
Please do not add categories to the page until it enters mainspace.
Advice: Most draftspace pages go nowhere. If you want the page to get into mainspace, you as the creator of the page should plan to do the work to get the page into mainspace.

TRS Spray orToxin Removal System spray is a fake autism cure being peddled as false hope to real parents and real children who have actual difficulties. Difficulties which are only being compounded by being scammed out of hundreds of dollars a month that could, I dunno, be used for actual therapy.

Claims[edit]

TRS Spray is just the latest in a very, very long line of chelation therapies being aimed at autistic children, although the website markets itself as a "passive cheolator" and distinguishes itself from "harsh medical chelators." These fake cures rely on the false premise that heavy metals cause autism. They don't; heavy metals cause heavy metal poisoning. You can tell by the fact that they have different names that they are two different things.[1][2][3]

The website [4] also uses common scam tactics, like throwing around high tech words like "nanotechnology" to make themselves sound science-y.

"Nanotechnology = Effectiveness Nano means that the particles are very small. For Advanced TRS, the average particle size is only 0.9 nanometers. By making the particles smaller, more of the cages are exposed to trap toxins."

Oh yeah? If I dissolve some salt in water I get Na+ ions that are .22 nanometers which is even smaller! Muahaha! Salt can cure you of autism! Take that! (Seriously though, all chemical compounds are at a nanoscale.)

Risks[edit]

Zeolite itself (the active ingredient in the spray) is probably harmless, but the Mirror reports "sweats and rashes" were reported in children.[5] Generally speaking it's not a good idea to give your child unregulated health supplements purchased over the internet.

Benefits[edit]

It benefit the three people in Utah[6] and the one person in the UK that gets your money.[7]

References[edit]

  1. NCAHF Policy Statement on Chelation Therapy
  2. Mayo Clinic on Chelation therapy and autism
  3. Zeolites, blood-brain barrier and “Autism Detox” scam
  4. Scammy website selling a scam
  5. Warning over parents using 'detox' spray causing sickness to treat autistic kids
  6. https://www.dnb.com/business-directory/company-profiles.coseva.404cd9302d5eb80cf4c4062dca8165d4.html
  7. https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/11871062