RationalWiki's 2020 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff – we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone who saw this today donated $5, we would meet our goal for 2021.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2120Goal: $3500

Martin Smith

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
A guide to
U.K. Politics
Icon politics UK.svg
God Save the Queen?
Merge-arrows 2.svg An editor believes this article contains duplicate material.
This article may have a content or subject overlap with Unite Against Fascism. The pages could be merged. You can discuss this at RationalWiki:Duplicate articles.

Martin Smith is a far-left British campaigner. He is a national officer of Unite Against Fascism and national coordinator of Love Music Hate Racism.

In 2010 he was convicted of assaulting a police officer during an anti-BNP protest the previous year.[1]

He was once national secretary of the Socialist Workers Party until January 2011; according to Andy Newman of the Socialist Unity blog, he was forced to step down after sexually harassing a female SWP member.[2]

Socialist Workers Party Central Committee departure[edit]

In January 2013 a scandal broke out within the party when it was revealed that he had been accused of rape and sexual assault, and that the SWP held a hearing itself (finding him not guilty) rather than reporting him to the authorities.[3][4][5]

The incident prompted a bizarre rant from Gilad Atzmon, who claimed that Smith was being victimised by a "Judeocentric tribal coalition" because he has supported Atzmon in the past.[6]

External links[edit]

References[edit]