Information icon.svg

Nominations for the RationalMedia Foundation 2019 board of trustees election are now open!

Tom DeLonge

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Are those 3 UFOs above DeLonge's head?
The woo is out there
UFOlogy
Icon ufology.svg
Aliens did it...
... and ran away
What if people knew that these were real
I'd leave my closet door open all night
I know the CIA would say
What you hear is all hearsay
I wish someone would tell me what was right
—"Aliens Exist", Blink-182[1]

Tom DeLonge (1975–) is an American musician and songwriter best known for his work with comedy punk ensemble Blink-182 ("All the Small Things", "What's My Age Again?", Enema of the State). Since the demise of Blink-182 in 2005, he has pursued a range of activities, including a growing interest in UFOs, cryptozoology, and conspiracy theories. His organisation To The Stars has attracted some status within the strange world of UFO research, although as yet he has failed to prove the existence of extraterrestrials.[2]

Life[edit]

He grew up in Poway, San Diego County, California and formed Blink-182 while at high school. After a few small hits, their breakthrough came with the Enema of the State album in 1999. He launched a short-lived side project, Box Car Racer, in 2002. Blink-182 split up in 2005: this has been blamed on DeLonge's desire to concentrate on investigations of UFOs, but seems to have been more due to tensions in the band over DeLonge wanting to spend more time with his family and tour less. After, he founded another band, Angels & Airwaves, and Blink-182 briefly reformed, with an album, Neighborhoods, in 2011; DeLonge later quit the band and released solo material in 2015. He also worked on a young adult book series, Poet Anderson, and co-directed an animated short film, Poet Anderson: The Dream Walker, with aspirations to turn it into a feature film. And then there is his interest in strange flying things.[2][3]

UFOs[edit]

He had a long-time interest in UFOs and conspiracies around them, with the 1999 song "Aliens Exist" mentioning Majestic 12 and the CIA. Box Car Racer's album was full of lyrics about conspiracy theories. He even got married in 2001 on Coronado Island, California, which was the scene of an alleged alien encounter in 1994 in which 2 people allegedly received alien implants.[3] (It's hard to write about DeLonge without using the word "alleged" a lot.)

DeLonge founded the To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science Inc in 2015 to investigate UFOs, with employees including former agents of the American intelligence services and scientists.[4][3] Its mission statement includes the modest goal to "revolutionize the human experience … through the unrestricted support of breakthrough research, discovery and innovation."[5] Luis Elizondo, former boss of the Pentagon's Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, later moved to DeLonge's Academy.[5] To The Stars has also worked with EarthTech International in Austin, Texas, apparently "a privately-funded research organization exploring novel ideas".[3]

Although it hasn't found conclusive proof, its investigations have been reported in at least three New York Times articles (including one which featured video footage recorded by a US Navy gun camera allegedly showing UFOs, or blobs). To The Stars was cited as a source about revelations that senators Harry Reid, Daniel Inouye, and Ted Stevens had directed federal money to UFO investigations.[3][6] DeLonge also claims credit for the US Navy setting up procedures to record UFO sightings.[6]

He has worked on several books. He cowrote Sekret Machines: Gods with Peter Levenda about his UFO investigations. It suggests that ancient Greek myths and Biblical stories about gods or angels mating with humans and creating monsters could be a record of alien breeding experiments.[4] (This would have more validity if there was any evidence that Greek myths were in some way true.) He also co-wrote Sekret Machines Book 1: Chasing Shadows and sequels, an attempt to express his ideas via the medium of epically-long conspiracy fiction.[7][8][9]

According to emails "obtained" by Wikileaks, he emailed Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta about UFOs.[3] He has also reportedly met with Podesta at least once to discuss UFOs.[10] In an email to Podesta, DeLonge claimed to have been working with Major General William McCasland, commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. DeLonge told Podesta:
When Roswell crashed, they shipped it to the laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. General McCasland was in charge of that exact laboratory up to a couple years ago."[10][11]

DeLonge received the honor "UFO Researcher of the Year" from "Credible UFO News and Information" website OpenMinds.tv.[3] In a 2017 appearance on Joe Rogan's podcast "The Joe Rogan Experience", according to press reports DeLonge's claims included:[3][12]

  • Early UFOs were human-created craft made using alien technology by former Nazis living in Argentina,
  • Fear of alien invasion prevented the Cold War turning into a hot war,
  • One of his government contacts had seen a dead alien body,
  • Men in black had taken him in for interrogation, holding him for 2 days,
  • Humans are descended from aliens,
  • Aliens currently walk the earth.

On the other hand, some conspiracy theorists believe he's actually an agent of the deep state disseminating misinformation.[3]

However, catching aliens is an expensive business. In 2018, To The Stars reported to authorities that while it had managed to raise US$1m in funding: "The Company has incurred losses from operations and has an accumulated deficit at June 30, 2018 of $37,432,000. These factors raise doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern."[4]

Cryptozoology[edit]

Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker told Joe Rogan's podcast that during their time in the band, as well as looking for UFOs, DeLonge would get high and decide "Let's go and fucking look for Bigfoot" and lead a group of people into the wilderness on a Sasquatch hunt.[13] No Bigfoots have yet been captured.[citation NOT needed]

Selected bibliography[edit]

His writings on UFOs and unexplained phenomena:

  • Sekret Machines Book 1: Chasing Shadows, Tom Delonge, A J Hartley, 2017
  • Sekret Machines: Gods: An Official Investigation of the UFO Phenomenon, Tom DeLonge, Peter Levenda, Jacques Vallee, 2017
  • Sekret Machines Book 2: A Fire Within, Tom DeLonge, A J Hartley, 2018

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "Aliens Exist", Blink-182, from Enema of the State album, 1999. Songwriters: Tom DeLonge / Mark Hoppus / Travis Barker, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
  2. 2.0 2.1 See the Wikipedia article on Tom DeLonge.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 We believe Tom DeLonge, who quit blink-182 to prove aliens exist, Drew Millard, The Outline, Jan 12, 2018
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 All the dumb things? UFO project has $37 million deficit, Ars Technica, October 15, 2018
  5. 5.0 5.1 Tom DeLonge's UFO Research Project Seems Increasingly Legit, Vice, Dec 17, 2017
  6. 6.0 6.1 Tom DeLonge on ‘Scary’ UFO Footage, Angels and Airwaves and Blink-182’s Future, Rolling Stone, June 4, 2019
  7. 'Sekret Machines: Gods' Reiterates: All Religion Is UFO Religion, PopMatters, 23 Aug 2017
  8. Aliens Exist: Five things we learnt from Tom DeLonge's book, Upset, April 11, 2016
  9. Tom DeLonge on new 'Sekret Machines' book: 'This is not just Tom talking about UFOs again', Entertainment Weekly, April 5, 2016
  10. 10.0 10.1 The DeLonge DeLusion: Part One, Mysterious Universe, Nov 3, 2016
  11. "General McCasland", email from Tom DeLonge dated "2016-01-25 16:04", published on Wikileaks
  12. Joe Rogan Experience #1029 - Tom DeLonge (Oct 26, 2017) YouTube (archived from December 31, 2018).
  13. Tom DeLonge would get high and go hunting for Big Foot while on tour with Blink-182, NME, Feb 7, 2019