Difference between revisions of "Crusades"

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Just scraping the surface. 95% of RW should be rewritten.)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
<center>{{q|Kill them all. Let God sort them out.|Abbot Arnold Amaury}}</center>
 
<center>{{q|Kill them all. Let God sort them out.|Abbot Arnold Amaury}}</center>
  
The '''Crusades''' were an attempt by the [[Christianity|Christian]] nations of [[Europe]] to force the Muslims out of present-day [[Israel]] (and some of the surrounding lands). They might have been considered a response to Islam's four hundred years of unbridled expansion, had they been aimed at, for example, the conquered Christian lands in Spain, rather than the relatively peaceful and enlightened areas in the Levant.  The first one worked remarkably well.  After that, they all went down hill. One even attacked the Christian city of Byzantium (was Constantinople, now Istanbul).
+
The '''Crusades''' were a series of military expeditions aimed at the conquest, maintenance and restoration of the [[Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem]]. They might have been considered a response to Islam's four hundred years of unbridled expansion, had they been aimed at, for example, the conquered Christian lands in Spain, rather than the relatively peaceful and enlightened areas in the Levant.<ref>Whoever inserted this is a moron. The Islamic Al-Andalus was equally (Perhaps more) enlightened than anything the near east had to offer. Another devastating example of RW's tendency to make insane and retarded comments for reasons of bizarre sexual gratification.</ref> The first one worked remarkably well.  After that, they all went down hill.<ref>Again, a moron apparantly wrote this article. Considering the obstacles facing the Third Crusade King Richard of England and Aquitaine achieved a remarkable victory in maintaining any sort of Christian presence in the east.</ref> One even attacked the Christian city of Byzantium (was Constantinople, now Istanbul).
  
 
Crusades were also launched against pagan tribes in eastern Germany and Poland, and one (the Albigensian Crusade) was sent against a heretic Christian group, the Cathars (it is this crusade that the famous quote at the top of the page was from).
 
Crusades were also launched against pagan tribes in eastern Germany and Poland, and one (the Albigensian Crusade) was sent against a heretic Christian group, the Cathars (it is this crusade that the famous quote at the top of the page was from).
  
 
In modern usage, a crusade is any really strong mission or movement based on some kind of moral or ideological backing.  Most often, it is used to suggest a foolish endeavor, but not always.
 
In modern usage, a crusade is any really strong mission or movement based on some kind of moral or ideological backing.  Most often, it is used to suggest a foolish endeavor, but not always.
 +
 +
==Disclaimer==
 +
 +
<references/>
 +
 
[[Category:History]]
 
[[Category:History]]
 
[[Category:Religion]]
 
[[Category:Religion]]
 
[[Category:Politics]]
 
[[Category:Politics]]
 
{{stub}}
 
{{stub}}

Revision as of 21:00, 8 July 2009

Kill them all. Let God sort them out.- Abbot Arnold Amaury

The Crusades were a series of military expeditions aimed at the conquest, maintenance and restoration of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. They might have been considered a response to Islam's four hundred years of unbridled expansion, had they been aimed at, for example, the conquered Christian lands in Spain, rather than the relatively peaceful and enlightened areas in the Levant.[1] The first one worked remarkably well. After that, they all went down hill.[2] One even attacked the Christian city of Byzantium (was Constantinople, now Istanbul).

Crusades were also launched against pagan tribes in eastern Germany and Poland, and one (the Albigensian Crusade) was sent against a heretic Christian group, the Cathars (it is this crusade that the famous quote at the top of the page was from).

In modern usage, a crusade is any really strong mission or movement based on some kind of moral or ideological backing. Most often, it is used to suggest a foolish endeavor, but not always.

Disclaimer

  1. Whoever inserted this is a moron. The Islamic Al-Andalus was equally (Perhaps more) enlightened than anything the near east had to offer. Another devastating example of RW's tendency to make insane and retarded comments for reasons of bizarre sexual gratification.
  2. Again, a moron apparantly wrote this article. Considering the obstacles facing the Third Crusade King Richard of England and Aquitaine achieved a remarkable victory in maintaining any sort of Christian presence in the east.