Difference between revisions of "Cunt"

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Historical references)
(Cunt in popular culture)
Line 23: Line 23:
 
*"See You Next Tuesday" is a catty acronym back-formation sometimes used intentionally.
 
*"See You Next Tuesday" is a catty acronym back-formation sometimes used intentionally.
 
*The Clash, in keeping with their observed policy of using one swear word per album, use the line "all the young cunts" several times in their song "All the Young Punks" on ''Give 'Em Enough Rope''.
 
*The Clash, in keeping with their observed policy of using one swear word per album, use the line "all the young cunts" several times in their song "All the Young Punks" on ''Give 'Em Enough Rope''.
 +
*One of the most popular insults liberals throw at Michelle Malkin is to call her a cunt.
  
 
==Historical references==
 
==Historical references==

Revision as of 04:09, 27 August 2008

No CP.svg
Don't bother checking Conservapedia, because its "article" about Cunt has been deleted and locked.


Cunt, referring to female genitalia, is one of the most taboo four letter words in the English language.

Etymologies

Error creating thumbnail: Unable to save thumbnail to destination
No Comment

The word vagina simply means "sheath" in Latin, and it has been in use in English for around three centuries.[1] "Cunt," by comparison, is a legitimate non-slang word with an extremely long history. There are cognates in other languages:

  • con in French
  • cunnus in Latin
  • kunta in Old Norse
  • cona in Portuguese
  • coño in modern Spanish
  • kut in Dutch

The word also has resemblances to "cunabula," a cradle and "cunicle," an obsolete word for a passage. The Romans extended the use of "cunnus" to mean whore in much the same way that English speakers used "cunt" as a perjorative term for "woman", as well as for a woman's anatomical parts.[2] This usage has now evolved into an abusive derogatory term which has given "cunt" an entirely new meaning,[3] particularly when applied to men as well as women.[4]

Shock value

A beauty cunt, eh?

Mark Lawson, writing in The Guardian (Feb 5, 2004), contends that the word has now lost its power to shock, at least in England.[5] This was following an outburst from punk icon John Lydon (one time member of the Sex Pistols), who, at 10:30 p.m. on February 4th 2004, during a mainstream live British television transmission of "I'm a celebrity, get me out of here!" accused the voting audience at home of being "fucking cunts" for failing to choose him as that night's loser. Fewer than 100 complaints were received by ITV1 (the broadcaster) and Ofcom (the regulatory authority) combined.

Cunt in popular culture

  • One of the many segments of The Vagina Monologues is called "I Call it Cunt".
  • "See You Next Tuesday" is a catty acronym back-formation sometimes used intentionally.
  • The Clash, in keeping with their observed policy of using one swear word per album, use the line "all the young cunts" several times in their song "All the Young Punks" on Give 'Em Enough Rope.
  • One of the most popular insults liberals throw at Michelle Malkin is to call her a cunt.

Historical references

  • In the first century BC, Cicero held that "cunnus" should be avoided as being obscene.
  • The City of London (ca. 1230) once boasted a Gropecuntelane
  • Chaucer used the word unblushingly in his Canterbury Tales (1387-1400). The Wife of Bath in her tale, says:
    • What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone?
    • Os it for ye wolde have my queynte allone?
  • In Twelfth Night (1600-1601) by William Shakespeare, the steward Malvolio picking up a letter, attempts to decipher it:
    • By my life, this is my lady's hand.
    • These be her very C's her U's and [n's omitted [6]]
    • Her T's, and thus she makes her great P's.
  • In The Royal Angler of Windsor, a ditty on the Subject of Nell Gwyn, Charles II's mistress, John, Wilmott, 2nd Earl of Rochester writes:
    • However weak and slender be the string,
    • Bait it with Cunt, and it will hold a king.
  • By the time that Robert Burns came to write his Merrie Muses of Caledonia (ca. 1800), the use of the word was expurgated from the text:
    • For ilka hair upon her c___t
    • Was worth a royal ransom.
  • The word was used several times in the first part of the 20th century by authors such as D.H.Lawrence in Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928), and James Joyce, in Ulysses (1922), in which he describes the Dead Sea as ".. the grey silken cunt of the Holy Land". However, it was not until Lady Chatterley's Lover was finally cleared for full publication in 1959 (US) and 1960 (UK) that the word "cunt" could once again be used in mainstream literature.
  • The word is still taboo on mainstream British television, but Kenny Everett (who?) had a character called "Cupid Stunt".

See also

References

  1. The oldest example of "vagina" in the Oxford English Dictionary comes from 1682, pre-dating the first use of the word Penis by around two years
  2. Rawson, H. (1981), A Dictionary of euphemisms and other doubletalk, Macdonald
  3. The Urban Dictionary only admits of the term being abusive towards women
  4. However, in some online dictionaries, such as Your Dictionary, one of the definitions cited is: "a disparaging term for a person one dislikes or finds extremely disagreeable"
  5. Has swearing lost its power to shock?
  6. It should be noted that "cut" meant the same thing as "cunt" in Elizabethan slang