Difference between revisions of "Fahrenheit 451"

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(See also)
Line 1: Line 1:
'''''Fahrenheit 451''''' is the title of a [[dystopia]]n novel by [[Ray Bradbury]]. It profiles a not-so-distant future where reading is outlawed and people are hopelessly narcissistic. It was meant as a critique of American pop culture in 1953, which Bradbury saw as anti-intellectual and dangerously hedonistic.
+
'''''Fahrenheit 451''''' is the title of a [[dystopia]]n novel by [[Ray Bradbury]]. It profiles a not-so-distant future where reading is outlawed and people are hopelessly narcissistic. It was meant as a critique of American pop culture in 1953, which Bradbury saw as anti-intellectual and dangerously hedonistic; Bradbury's vision took this to an extreme, creating a world where the general population had come to believe that anything intellectually challenging was more trouble than it was worth, and thus anything even remotely controversial was to be destroyed.
 +
 
 +
Later readers have generally seen the book to be a cautionary tale against any form of censorship against unpopular ideas, of which Bradbury's original scenario of censorship by mob rule is only one of the more insidious forms.  
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 06:43, 4 March 2009

Fahrenheit 451 is the title of a dystopian novel by Ray Bradbury. It profiles a not-so-distant future where reading is outlawed and people are hopelessly narcissistic. It was meant as a critique of American pop culture in 1953, which Bradbury saw as anti-intellectual and dangerously hedonistic; Bradbury's vision took this to an extreme, creating a world where the general population had come to believe that anything intellectually challenging was more trouble than it was worth, and thus anything even remotely controversial was to be destroyed.

Later readers have generally seen the book to be a cautionary tale against any form of censorship against unpopular ideas, of which Bradbury's original scenario of censorship by mob rule is only one of the more insidious forms.

See also