Green Party

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Green Party USA logo
Perhaps you were looking for Hippies?

The Green Party (officially known as the Global Greens[1]) is an international political party, or perhaps more accurately a group of loosely-connected parties around the world. Although specific policies of "Green" parties vary from country to country, the central ideology common to all of them is environmentalism.

While some Greens are non-religious, the roots of the movement can be found in New Age and proto-New Age groups. The parties used to attract some of the idle rich youngsters that previously went over to Communist groups, but since gaining power/influence in various areas, notably Germany, have instigated pro-business and even pro-war policies.

Contents

[edit] The Green Party of the United States (GPUS)

In the United States, it is a third party, slightly larger than the Libertarian Party in total size, meaning it got 0.36% of the overall Presidential vote in the last election instead of the 0.99% of the Libertarian Party (Apparently, Greens don't know how to vote).[2][3] Of states that allow party registration and publicly report party tallies, there are slightly over 300,000 registered Greens.[4] Anyone want to do the math on 300,000/146,000,000 or so? Oh, yeah, at best, 0.2%. Nice job.

Its basic positions are:

  • Grassroots democracy
  • Social justice and equal opportunity
  • Ecological wisdom
  • Non-violence
  • Decentralization
  • Community-based economics and economic justice
  • Feminism and gender equality
  • Respect for diversity
  • Personal and global responsibility
  • Future focus and sustainability
  • Marijuana decriminalization

On the local level, state Green parties have had success electing mayors,[5] city council members, municipal government members, and state representative (in 2012, they elected Arkansas state representative Fred Smith). Currently there are about as many Green office holders as Libertarian ones. In 2009, fifty Greens were elected.[6] In 2012, the number of Greens elected was in the 30s.

Ralph Nader was a notable member of the Green Party. His presidential run during the 2000 elections was hugely successful, as he garnered almost 3,000,000 votes[7] and may have had a spoiler effect by taking voters away from Al Gore. His runs in 2004 and 2008 as an independent did not attract similar support, though he still beat the official Green candidates by a large margin.

In the 2008 elections, former Democratic Rep. Cynthia McKinney was the presidential nominee. She received approx. 161,000 votes, or 0.12% of the popular vote.

In the 2012 elections, physician Jill Stein was the nominee,[8] getting around 397,000 votes, or one-third of 1% of the popular vote.

[edit] Youth organizations

Campus Greens is the student organization of the party which is composed of students and teachers of universities, colleges and high schools.

[edit] Woo

The Green Party seems to be infatuated with nature woo. For example, their platform states opposition to modern medicine and education in favor of the "Great School" (nature, of course) and the "Great Hospital" (once again, nature).

They also support publicly funded homeopathy [9] and oppose water fluoridation[10].

[edit] The Green Party in the UK

Despite their media portrayal, there are three different Green Parties in the UK: The Green Party of England and Wales, The Scottish Green Party, and the Green Party of Northern Ireland. All of these work closely together at a UK and EU level. The Green Party in Wales appears to be steering itself towards becoming a separate party too.

There is currently just one Green MP in UK parliament, as well as two Green MSPs in the Scottish Parliament, and their votes enabled the Scottish National Party to form a minority administration, rather than a hung parliament after the 2007 elections. In England, the Green Party has 18 county councillors[11] and sends two representatives to the European Parliament.[12]

Despite the Green Party's good intentions regarding the environment, they have some stances that may hinder research and development in some areas of biology. For example, the Green Party press officer Scott Redding claimed that "animal testing may be more harmful than helpful." In regards to GM crops, Redding claimed that "we draw a distinction between the application of a technology, which we believe has been proven to be socially destructive" and went on to say "we do not accept the self-serving claims of multinationals that GM crops can solve world hunger, the fuel crisis and any myriad of global problems," as it is infinitely more important to remain ideologically pure than to save lives with golden rice.[wp][13]

[edit] Other countries

Green Parties in other countries have had more success than in North America. Kenyan GP member Wangari Maathai was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2004. In New Zealand, the Green Party, after winning seats in 3 major elections, supplied the ruling left-wing Labour Party with "supply and confidence" votes during Labour's 9-year reign and implemented many of its own policies despite having a dope-smoking, skateboarding, Rasta as a senior Member of Parliament.[14]

Germany's GP has been strong and influential, especially in the late nineties and early noughties when it formed part of the government. After the conservative party (CDU) made some big mistakes, the Green Party in Germany came in as second in the regional elections in Baden-Württemberg and now has the position of "Ministerpräsident" (something like a Governor) in Baden-Württemberg.

In the Canadian province of Quebec, the Green Party is known for supporting anglophone rights. In the 2011 election, the Green Party of Canada won its first seat ever.[15]

Finland's Green Party is minor (10 parliamentary seats out of 200 as of 2012) but has been in government multiple times. Their presidential candidate, Pekka Haavisto, finished second in the 2012 presidential election, receiving 37.4% of the votes despite the the obvious hindrances of being openly homosexual and having an Ecuadorian spouse.[16]

[edit] Footnotes

United States political parties
Alaskan Independence Party - American Independent Party - Christian Liberty Party - Communist Party USA - Constitution Party - DINO - Democratic-Republican Party - Democratic Party - Federalist Party - Know Nothing - Libertarian Party - Modern Whig party - National Atheist Party - Progressive Labor Party - Prohibition Party - RINO - Radical Republicans - Reform Party - Republican Party - Revolutionary Communist Party (US) - Socialist Party USA - Socialist Workers Party (US) - States' Rights Democratic Party - Workers World Party - World Socialist Party of the United States - Yippie -
Political parties of the United Kingdom
British Freedom Party - British National Party - Christian Party - Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist) - Conservative Party (UK) - English Democratic Party - English Democrats - Green Party of England & Wales - Islamic Party of Britain - Labour Party - Liberal Democrats - Liberty GB - National Front - New Communist Party of Britain - Official Monster Raving Loony Party - Plaid Cymru - Political parties of the United Kingdom - Respect Party - Scottish Green Party - Scottish National Party - Socialist Party of Great Britain - Socialist Workers Party - United Kingdom Independence Party - Workers Revolutionary Party -
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Community
Tools
support