Campaign!

G'day, fellow RationalWikians! Don't forget to visit the Campaign page of the 2016 Board of trustees election in order to make your voice heard. Suggested activities include:

  • Endorsing select candidates (lending a hand to your loyal henchmen and/or glorious overlords!)
  • Anti-endorsing select candidates (character-assassinating your hated opponents!)
  • Providing moar goat (please wipe afterwards)
  • Just asking questions to the candidates

Your participation might help other users better direct their votes. More importantly, it'll show the world that we've yet to go full Citizendium in terms of election hype!

from FuzzyCatPotato (Talk), group Site wide (urgent) at 00:24, 25 July 2016

Age of Autism

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Needles are scary

Anti-vaccination
movement

Icon vax.svg
Pricks against pricks

Age of Autism (often abbreviated to AoA) is a site that hosts the blogs of the ableist leaders in the field of anti-vaccination crankery and has little to do with actual autism other than the false claim that vaccines cause autism.[1] Their bloggers include the likes of Mark Blaxill, David Kirby, J.B. Handley, and, of course, Jenny McCarthy. They also peddle "treatments" for autism produced by alternative medicine woo-meister Lee Silsby, which consist of vitamin supplements and other nature woo. Age of Autism, being the cesspool of the craziest of the anti-vaccine movement, has invoked several arguments horrible in both quality and in taste, which, of course, involves the typical PRATTs of the anti-vaccine movement that can probably fill the entire bingo card.

In a pathetic attempt at being reasonable, they proclaim themselves as "not anti-vaccine, just pro-safe vaccine" even though they have aimed their fear-mongering cannons at Gardasil[2] and the meningitis vaccine,[3] which are irrelevant to autism.

Not surprisingly for an anti-vaccine crank website, Age of Autism views itself as a champion for the so-called "medical rights" including the "right" to refuse the vaccine because they think the misinformed parent can make a decision better than a professional government-sponsored medical organization. They draw depressingly awful analogies of vaccines to things like human trafficking, rape, and, of course, Hitler and nazism. They also push conspiracy theories about Big Pharma (among others) and, interestingly, still believe they're "winning".[4] Like any fringe vaccine conspiracy site, they fear and hate the CDC like Alex Jones does FEMA.[5]

Bottom line, if not implied a hundred times here, they're the to-go site for the lowest parts of the anti-vaccination movement.

[edit] External links

[edit] References

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools