Bronze-level articleRoger Leir

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
The woo is out there

UFOlogy

Icon ufology.svg
Aliens did it...
... and ran away
Few things are worse than a negligent podiatrist.
Penn Jillette, Penn & Teller: Bullshit![1]

Roger K. Leir, D.P.M., (1934-2014)[2] was a podiatricWikipedia's W.svg[Note 1] surgeon, ufologist, and self-described "alien abduction researcher" best known as an investigator of allegedly alien implants.

Leir appeared frequently on television and talk radio programs devoted to ufology.[3][4] His work also plays a part in the targeted individual movement.[5] He had the great honour of being mocked featured on the "alien abduction" episode of Penn & Teller: Bullshit! alongside other brilliant minds, such as David Icke.[1]

Contents

[edit] Claims

It is my opinion that someone, or some entity, from somewhere else, is implanting these devices into human beings so that they can monitor genetic changes which are occurring in the human body.
—Dr. Roger Leir[1]

Leir said he had removed about a dozen implants from people's bodies[Note 2] and claimed they were devices that "emit radio signals". Leir alleged that some of the implants had physically moved during surgery, as if to avoid removal.[Note 3] This despite the fact that — in a video he himself provided to skeptics of this exact phenomenon taking place — it quite instantly becomes obvious that Leir is the one responsible for the perceived movement, forcefully pushing around a mobile lump of subcutaneous fat with his thumb.[1] Leir said that laboratory testing of the implants "implied they were of extraterrestrial origin".[6][7] Sounds like the exact type of conclusion an actual, accredited laboratory would settle on, doesn't it?

His first book, the Aliens and the Scalpel [sic], was alleged by Leir to have sold over 10,000 copies by 2003.[1] By that time, Leir claims his third book was recently out — in Portuguese. Desculpa![Note 4]

[edit] Criticism and probation

The only thing otherwordly about that case is the fact that someone would claim that the piece is extraterrestrial.
Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Glenn Pfeffer on the random splinters claimed by Dr Leir to be alien implants[1]

Penn & Teller: Bullshit! revealed that in 1999, Leir was found guilty of having committed "repeated acts of negligence" by the California Board of Podriatic Medicine, serving 3 years of probation.[8]

Both Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Glenn Pfeffer and Skeptical investigator Joe Nickell explained that the "implants" are ordinary objects such as pieces of metal or shards of glass that become lodged in tissue similar to splinters. Other "implants" are simply a collection of fat cells that become disconnected (which are harmless).[1][6] Nickell said that Leir's associate, Derrel Sims, supposedly refused to cooperate when asked to provide a forensic medical institute with specimens or photos for analysis.

[edit] External links

[edit] Notes

  1. This literally means "foot doctor".
  2. Basically the textbook definition of "unnecessary surgery".
  3. Never fear, the man with a scalpel will chase after them into whichever nook or cranny of your body they might flee into. "Just keep digging!"
  4. https://translate.google.com/?tl=pt#en/pt/Sorry

[edit] References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Penn & Teller: Bullshit!, episode 1.03, Alien Abductions
  2. Obituary by none other than Coast to Coast AM; "R.I.P. Dr. Roger Leir". Coast to Coast AM. 2014-03-16. http://www.coasttocoastam.com/article/r-i-p-dr-roger-leir. Retrieved 2014-03-16. 
  3. "Roger Leir". imdb.com. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2332135/. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 
  4. "Dr. Roger Leir". Coast to Coast AM. http://www.coasttocoastam.com/guest/leir-dr-roger/5743. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  5. The Targeted Individuals United Association website features a short bio on the late Dr. Roger Leir (linking especially to a YouTube video in which Dr. Leir underscores the fundamental alien involvement in the TI phenomenon) finally providing a banner link to the the good doctor's website - AlienScalpel.com.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Joe Nickell (24 October 2001). Real-Life X-Files: Investigating the Paranormal. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 124–. ISBN 978-0-8131-3727-8. https://books.google.com/books?id=4Bm-EjjG3AwC&pg=PT124. Retrieved 29 March 2013. 
  7. R. Stephen White (1 June 1998). Why science?. Nova Science. ISBN 978-1-56072-748-4. https://books.google.com/books?id=giwIAQAAMAAJ. Retrieved 30 March 2013. 
  8. Doctor of Podiatric Medicine License No. E-1171 (respondent), Case No. 1B-94-35623.


Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools