Board elections.

The RationalMedia Foundation board elections are a'happenin'.

  • Nominations will commence on 26 June 2016 and run through 10 July 2016.
  • The voting dates are TBA.

To register to vote: RationalWiki:RationalMedia Foundation/Voter registration

Useful links:

from FuzzyCatPotato (Talk), group Site wide (urgent) at 18:49, 26 June 2016

Internet

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Someone is wrong on

The Internet

Icon internet.svg
Log in:
Every single one of the 247 billion facts on the internet is wrong.
—Jeremy Clarkson[1]

The internet, Internet, interwebs, or internets is a global network of millions of smaller computer networks and was invented by Al Gore. It is not to be confused with the "World Wide Web" that gives us the www subdomain, any series of tubes you might come upon, or real life.

[edit] "Internet" vs. "World Wide Web"

Use it at your own risk.

What most people call the "Internet" is actually the World Wide Web, as the general public will use the terms interchangeably.

The Internet began as several computer linkages within the state of California. While most people think the Internet was created in the late 80s or early 90s, the Internet actually began in 1969, and has roots which are much older than that. The de facto creation occurred in October 1969, with what was called the ARPANET, when "e-mail" messages were first exchanged by two university computers: one at Stanford University, and the other at U.C.L.A. Through a series of various developments and incarnations in the 70's, this later gave way to TCP/IP by 1982, whose final form (well, mostly excluding IPv6) is today's Internet.

By contrast, the World Wide Web, which was developed in 1989-1990 and publicly launched in 1991, is a series of tubes collection of hypertext documents and domains that use the internet via web servers. It took until about 1997 for this to become anything like today's internet, and computer speeds have increased exponentially since then. Few imagine that the internet existed before the '90s, but it was very much around. It was used mainly by the government, the military, and university personnel, as only they were able to afford the computing resources required. Even the "mini" computers[wp] then in use were the size of file cabinets, and needed more or less constant expert attention.

[edit] Footnotes

  1. Qi (E04S02)
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
support
Community
Tools