From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
If you are considering suicide, you are not alone, and there is help.

If you know someone who is considering suicide, the same applies.

Tell me about
your mother


Icon psychology.svg
Let us examine...
Random examples

Suicide is the act of deliberately killing oneself.


[edit] Religion

Suicide is viewed by various religions as a sin, including Islam (which puts a damper on suicide bombers claims to those 74 virgins), Judaism, Hinduism and some groups of Christianity (despite Jesus Christ basically committing suicide-by-proxy),[1] usually because of "thou shalt not kill", sanctity of life, God's will, and such stuff. God is considered infinitely loving and compassionate, but by this logic has little or no compassion for those whose desperation and misery overcome their survival instinct.

Treating suicide as a mortal sin is almost certainly a retrofit, due to the discovery that preaching eternal happiness in heaven, as the Christian faith does, led to people killing themselves in order to get there faster, a trend which ended with Augustine of Hippo's redefinition of suicide as a sin, rather than a valid means of martyrdom.[2]

It should be noted that modern Catholic doctrine acknowledges that most suicides happen due to mental illness, and thus are not a mortal sin due to lack of moral responsibility.

[edit] Assisted suicide

Assisted suicide is the provision to an individual of the means necessary to kill oneself. In the few jurisdictions where this is legal, the only person legally empowered to provide such means is a licensed physician; thus, this process is also known as physician-assisted death (PAD). Assisted suicide/PAD is a form of euthanasia, but it is distinct from euthanasia, as the individual being euthanized is (ostensibly) performing the act him/herself.

Assisted suicide is a controversial political issue.[3] It is legal in the Netherlands, Colombia, Switzerland, Japan, Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, Estonia, and Albania; the US states of Washington, Oregon, California, New Mexico,[4] Montana, and Vermont;[5] and the Canadian province of Quebec.[6] In every state and jurisdiction where it is legal, strict regulations exist to ensure the individual performing suicide has a serious, painful, and debilitating terminal illness (typically with six months or less to live), is mentally and physically capable of administering the suicide drugs him/herself, has given informed consent several times, and has the opportunity to withdraw such consent at every stage of the process.

At least one person in the US (a 90-year-old woman with no medical qualifications) has been prosecuted for selling mail-order "suicide kits."[7]

[edit] Suicide threats

The threat of suicide can make a person feel manipulated; while these threats should be taken seriously, people who are faced with threats of suicide by others should not allow themselves to be manipulated by them.[8][9][10] The FAQ of the pro-suicide choice newsgroup (ASH) argues that expressed suicidal ideation is often misinterpreted as manipulation because people believe that a truly suicidal person would have killed themselves already.

The person could simply wish to discuss whether suicide is the best option because he is not yet sure and wants input from others. The a.s.h. FAQ claims "Many complicating factors require significant time to think through in order to decide whether or not to commit suicide. But even if one has decided to exit, there is also a matter of choosing, planning, and carrying out a suicide method. Suicide is not easy . . . and many people require much deliberation before deciding how to go about it."[11] Eight out of ten people considering suicide give some sign of their intentions. People who talk about suicide, threaten suicide, or call suicide crisis centers are 30 times more likely than average to kill themselves.[12]

[edit] Dissident views

Thomas Szasz drew a comparison between suicide and self-medication, arguing that both are activities that were once allowed by law and that, according to libertarian theory, should be re-legalized as basic human rights.[13]

[edit] See also

[edit] External links

[edit] Suicide prevention

[edit] United States

[edit] United Kingdom

[edit] General

[edit] Footnotes

  1. It is thought by some that Jesus' death counts as sacrifice (to forgive humanity's sins); however, this means an omnipotent God sacrificed his son and/or himself in order to forgive. It has been argued that it does not count as a sacrifice at all. It's also possible for something to be both a sacrifice and suicide of course.
  2. Suicide:A European Perspective by Nils Retterstøl at Google books
  4. PAD exists in a legal grey area in New Mexico. While not permitted by statute in New Mexico as in the five other states that permit it, a recent court ruling in Bernalillo County enjoins the state government from prohibiting the practice, and the ruling's applicability to other counties in the state has not yet been tested.
  5. The Psychiatry of Palliative Medicine: The Dying Mind, Page 209, Sandy Macleod
  6. "Quebec end-of-life-care law means new era for health providers". Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  8. Feeling Manipulated by Suicide Threats?
  9. Myths about suicide
  10. What to do when feeling manipulated by suicide threats
  11. You don't *really* want to die, otherwise you would have done so by now, Are you for real?, The (a.s.h) FAQ
  12. Suicide, Mental Health America
  13. Assisted Suicide is Bootleg Suicide, Thomas Szasz, 23 November 2001, Los Angeles Times.
Personal tools