Essay:Disprove My Spiritualism Please

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Essay.svg This essay is an original work by MykalOfDefiance.
It does not necessarily reflect the views expressed in RationalWiki's Mission Statement, but we welcome discussion of a broad range of ideas.
Unless otherwise stated, this is original content, released under CC-BY-SA 3.0 or any later version. See RationalWiki:Copyrights.
Feel free to make comments on the talk page, which will probably be far more interesting, and might reflect a broader range of RationalWiki editors' thoughts.

Okay, I'm a rationalist. I'm not here to debate and prove myself right, I'm here to learn. Now off from the disclaimers, on to the meat.

Basically, I'm just representing the mind-body problem. But allow me to elaborate.

Practically anyone that says that consciousness is surely is just part of the brain points out, "We're basically giant, complex machines. Our thoughts and actions are derivative of a giant road map of nerves throughout our body, which neurons in our brain fire electrical jolts through. We're just electrically charged meat. There's nothing else in there, the consciousness must be part of our brain."

I understand this completely, I agree, I just arrive at the opposite conclusion. If we're just complex machines, from where does this experience of life come from? Where in my gears is my sentience? Humans could more than likely construct a machine that operates in a manner very similar to our nervous system, yet it is considered a mechanical impossibility to construct an artificial consciousness, which is why machine apocalypse movies will always be in the sci-fi section. And what about other complex machines? Say for instance, the universe. Is the universe sentient? What other way to describe that would there be than "god"?

I'm not saying there's a god. I don't believe in god. I'm just saying, the fact that we are truly just complex constructs of organic, natural material leads me to the question of what this inorganic, unnatural phenomena is rather than answers it.