Talk:Clyde Winters

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Icon sociology.svg This article contains information about one or more living persons.

Articles about living people must be handled carefully, because they are more open to legal threats.
Reference any contentious allegations solidly; unreferenced allegations should be removed.
If legal threats are raised on this page, please direct the potential litigant to RationalWiki:Legal FAQ; do not interact with them.

Archives for this talk page: <1>, <2>, (new)


This page is full of bias and heresay[edit]

Dear Sir This website has information that is based on heresay. I feel that I should be allowed to edit this page because the information is false and libelous. I do not want to pursue this in a court of law unless I have too, but I am not a racist . For example, the author of this page claims I am unqualified to to decipher languages and write on genetics when I have a Masters' degree in linguistics and Anthropology from the University of Illinois-Urban. he acts as though I do not have an academic career this is false, Some of the corrections that should be made are below:

Background[edit]

Dr. Clyde Winters is an Educator and Anthropologist. He taught Education over 11 years at Governors State University-University Park, Illinois; and Liguistics at Saint Xavier University-Chicago.. Over the past 13 years he has taught Bilingual Education (courses: Educational Linguistic and Bilingual Language Assessment) and Educational Administration (courses: Educational Psychology, Curriculum, School Law, Leadership and Educational Research). He has contributed to the development of the revised editions of Allan A. Glatthorn, Floyd Boschee, Bruce M. Whitehead, Curriculum leadership: strategies for development and implementation http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1412967813/ref=s9_simh_gw_p14_d0_i3?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=desktop-1&pf_rd_r=0J8HEWHCA4335TFD71PD&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=2079475242&pf_rd_i=desktop

and ; R. G. Owens and T.C. Valesky , Organizational Behavior in Education: Leadership and School Reform (10th Edition) http://www.amazon.com/Organizational-Behavior-Education-Leadership-School/dp/0137017464/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1438478829&sr=8-2&keywords=Organizational+Behavior+in+Education%3A+Leadership+and+School+Reform (See: Prefaces).

Education[edit]

His listed[1][2] academic credentials include:

  • 1973 - B.A., Sociology/History (University of Illinois)
  • 1973 - M.A., Social Science, Minors: Linguistics and Anthropology (University of Illinois)
  • 1994 - M.S., Special Education Education (Chicago State University)
  • 2000 - Ph.D., Educational Psychology (Loyola University)

Dr. Winters has a Masters degree in Anthropology and Linguistics. This gives him the background to decipher ancient languages and write on population genetics.

Uthman dan Fodio Institute[edit]

Uthman dan Fodio Institute is a private research institute founded by Dr. Clyde Winters. It began as a home school to teach students in Elementary and High School. http://olmec98.net/UdFI.htm

Stephen Howe, Professor of History and Cultures of Colonialism, University of Bristol has noted:

The tendency to claim or imply grand-sounding academic careers and affiliations seems to be quite widespread among Afrocentrists.

He refers to Clyde Winters as an example.[3] Wim van Binsbergen (*1947), Amsterdam-trained anthropologist, proto-historian, and intercultural philosopher (various professorial chairs in Europe and Africa, Professor of Intercultural Philosophy, Erasmus University Rotterdam and Editor of Quest: An African Journal of Philosophy / Revue Africaine de Philosophie), commenting on Howe's work, in Black Athena Comes of Age, page 277, wrote: "Scholarly reputations are also readily sacrificed on the altar of Howe's indignation vis-a-vis Afrocentrism and the more readily so, the less Howe knows of their specialist field. The synthetic programmatic overview of Afrocentrism by Clyde Ahmad Winters is sarcastically dismissed (67), but no attention is paid to the same writers intriguing linguistic work published in authoritative international journals, tracing parallels between West African languages, Asian and native American contexts, and suggesting an unexpected Asian demension to African presence, thus challenging all accepted geo political wisdom".[1]

van Binsbergen observes that Dr. Winters is the "leading Afrocentrist"http://www.shikanda.net/topicalities/martin.htm.

Race discrimination case[edit]

Winters filed a race discrimination action against Iowa State University in 1991. He was employed as Director of the Black Cultural Center at Iowa State University from August 1974 to May 1975.

The case was dismissed because he failed to file his case in a timely fashion..[4]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. Curriculum Vitae
  2. ResearchGate
  3. Howe, Stephen. (1998). Afrocentrism: Mythical Pasts and Imagined Homes. London: Verso. p. 261.
  4. Winters v. Iowa State University, 768 F. Supp. 231 (N.D. Ill. 1991)

Craniometrics Support Kushite/African Origin of Mesopotamians[edit]

Stop acting as if Dr. Winters writings on the Sumerians and Elamites being Black is not supported by modern researchers. Col. Henry Rawlinson , used textual evidence to determine that a link existed between the Mesopotamians to their ancestors in Africa . Rawlinson called these people Kushites [1] The Kushites were Black. There is a positive relationship between crania from Africa and Eurasia which shows the Kushite origin of the Mesopotamians as claimed by Rawlinson. Modern researchers have confirmed that the ancient Mesopotamians were Africans. Ancient Sub-Saharan African skeletons have also been found in Mesopotamia (Tomczyk et al, 2010)[2]. The craniometric data indicates that continuity existed between ancient and medieval Sub-Saharan Africans in Mesopotamia (Ricault & Waelkens,2008)[3] Rawlinson, Dieulafoy, Tomczyk and Ricault are all white—not Afrocentrict scholars. The Tomczyk and Ricault articles are least than 7 years old.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. [ Henry Rawlinson, “ Letter read at the meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society on February 5, 1853”, The Athenaeum, (No. 1321) ,p.228; and H. Henry Rawlinson, “Note on the early History of Babylonia”, Journal Royal Asiatic Soc., 15, 215-259.]
  2. [www.interscience.wiley.com)DOI:10.1002/oa.1150]
  3. Ricaut,F.X. and Waelkens.2008. Cranial Discrete Traits in a Byzatine Population and Eastern Mediterranean Population Movements, Hum Biol, 80(5):535-564.]