Information icon.svg Please vote in the 2017 board of trustees election. The cabal thanks you for your service.

Kutub al-Sittah

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
A dime a dozen
Scriptures
Icon scriptures.svg
Divine scribblings

The Kutub al-Sittah (the six books) are the primary ahadith collections in Sunni Islam. They consist of Sahih BukhariWikipedia's W.svg, Sahih MuslimWikipedia's W.svg, Sunan al-SughraWikipedia's W.svg, Sunan Abu DawoodWikipedia's W.svg, Jami al-TirmidhiWikipedia's W.svg and Sunan ibn MajahWikipedia's W.svg.[1] The collections total tens of thousands of ahadith.

The first two collections, Sahih Bukhari and Sahih Muslim, are considered the most authentic; the word Sahih itself means "authentic." Authenticity decreases for each collection thereafter, although Islamic maddhabs (schools of religious law or fiqh) have differed on which of the non-Sahih collections are more or less trustworthy.[2]

Some Muslims, notably Quranists, consider all ahadith to be bid'ah (prohibited religious innovation), fabricated, or otherwise unacceptable.[3]

References[edit]

  1. John L. Esposito (2000). The Oxford History of Islam p. 74
  2. Ibn al-Salah (1990). `Aishah bint `Abd al-Rahman, ed. al-Muqaddimah fi `Ulum al-Hadith. Cairo: Dar al-Ma’aarif. pp. 160–9.
  3. Quranism