Tamara Siuda

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Drink the Kool-Aid
 Cults 
RW Cult Template.png
But you WANT to stay

Tamara Siuda (July 19, 1969–) is the head of the House of Netjer, and essentially thus head of the Kemetic Orthodox religion (quasi-revivalist form of Ancient Egyptian religion), as well as being a Mambo Asogwe in Haitian Vodun religion.[1] She also runs online storefronts selling Vodun[2] and Egyptian religious supplies and literature.[3]

Within Reconstructionist and Neo-pagan communities, she is a highly controversial figure, being accused of running what amounts to an exploitative cult, as well as being both insincere and hypocritical in her purported beliefs.[4][5]

Early history[edit]

Born in 1969, Siuda studied as an undergraduate at Mundelein College, Chicago. It was here in 1988 that she first developed an interest in Egyptian religion, after dabbling in Wicca. From this point on she arranged religious meetings with a few friends, and was present on AOL's spirituality forums in an official capacity.[6] The exact date of her founding of the House of Bast (later to be the House of Netjer) is unclear, but it seems to have developed quickly, for by 1992 she had attracted Craig Schaefer to the cause, who would become her "right hand man", and seemingly the organisational power behind the throne. In 1993 she had won official recognition from the State of Illinois for her religious institution,[6] using her family home in rural Illinois as its official base.

Moar power![edit]

By 1996 alarm bells should have been ringing. Siuda, as head of the Kemetic Orthodox faith and House of Netjer, travelled to Egypt for "Coronation" ceremonies at the ancient sites of Saqqara, Karnak, and Luxor. Siuda proclaimed herself to hold the "Kingly Ka", having herself crowned on the dais of the 3rd Dynasty Pharaoh Djoser. As of July 2011, Schaefer has retired from his visible role as head of the priesthood in House of Netjer, and since March 2011, Siuda herself has been downplaying her role as Nisut online, abandoning the Daily Kemet website and establishing a new portal in her real name with a far more secular focus. The full implications of, and the reasons for, this move are, at present, unclear.

Online presence[edit]

The group has been one of the early adopters of the internet, registering a slew of domain names, though most are explicitly stated to be part of HoN. As of 2011 the following sites are confirmed are "official" HoN sites, or those administered by Suida herself.

Siuda also continues to maintain an active online presence for her Vodun followers:

References[edit]

  1. http://www.legba.biz/chitatann.html Mambo Chita Tann (Mambo T) and La Sosyete Fòs Fè Yo Wè]
  2. Legba Crossroads Storefont
  3. Egyptian Prayers storefront
  4. Kemetics against Kemetic Orthodox/House of Netjer
  5. Meeting the Pharaoh
  6. 6.0 6.1 Krogh, M C and Pillifant, B A (2004), Kemetic Orthodoxy: ancient Egyptian religion on the Internet: A research note - Online text