Information icon.svg Voting is completed for the RationalWiki 2021 Moderator Election and the results are now posted.
Congratulations to the winners!

Virtual particles

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
The facts of the matter
Physics
Physicon.png
May the mass times acceleration be with you
Let's get physical!
Atoms trying to understand atoms
Warning icon orange.svg This page contains too many unsourced statements and needs to be improved.

Virtual particles could use some help. Please research the article's assertions. Whatever is credible should be sourced, and what is not should be removed.

Virtual particles are particles described by quantum physics that exist for an extremely limited space and time. The term virtual should not confuse you into thinking that these particles do not exist. They really do exist, interacting with other particles, producing a measurable effect on their surroundings.[1] The very laws of physics prevent them from ever actually being directly seen or measured.

Virtual particles do have mass, even when they are part of massless forms, such as photons.

How?[edit]

The vacuum of space (or, more correctly any "space") has an energy level. Nothingness is in fact something.[2] Due to the uncertainty principle, virtual particles will always appear from the energy of a vacuum and always appear in pairs. These particles "borrow" energy from the vacuum and immediately collide and annihilate themselves, repaying the energy back into the vacuum and thereby do not violate the laws of thermodynamics. This process has implications for the development and eventual dissipation of black holes; when a virtual pair appears next to the event horizon of a black hole, one particle may fall in and if that happens the other will free itself. In order to maintain the first law of thermodynamics (energy cannot be created or destroyed) the black hole must then give up a little of its own energy to repay the lost energy - this is called "Hawking radiation."

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-virtual-particles-rea/#
  2. One way to think of nothing being something in this context, is of "nothing" being the sum of all possible positive and negative energy states, just as how 0 can be thought of as the sum of all positive and negative numbers, as well as the layman context of it being actually nothing