Hepatitis

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Warning icon orange.svg This page contains too many unsourced statements and needs to be improved.

Hepatitis could use some help. Please research the article's assertions. Whatever is credible should be sourced, and what is not should be removed.


One of our pieces on
Biology
Icon bioDNA.svg
Life as we know it
Divide and multiply

Hepatitis is a spectrum of diseases with various causes involved, the most common being infection by several strains of hepatitis virus and alcoholism. The nature of some of the viruses having almost no cure (if any) results in the disease being a buzzword for various woosters to push their wootrition and snake oil.

What it does, how it spreads[edit]

The underlying causes of hepatitis causes damage to liver cells as in necrosis. The liver possessing some amount of regenerative capacity allows it to recover after some amount of repeated damages but eventually the complete regeneration capacity gets overused and scarring occurs.Wikipedia's W.svg Hepatitis A and E are mainly spread by contaminated food and water. Hepatitis B is mainly sexually transmitted, but may also be passed from mother to baby during pregnancy or childbirth. Both hepatitis B and hepatitis C are commonly spread through infected blood such as may occur during needle sharing by intravenous drug users. Hepatitis D can only infect people already infected with hepatitis B. Alcoholic hepatitis spreads via forbidden Jesus waters turned red. As of this writing, only hepatitis A and B are preventable via vaccination,[1] a massive pain for the antivaxxers who want vaccines gone. Both hepatitis B and C cause cancer in humans.[2]

Wootrition[edit]

The nature of Hepatitis B and C being almost incurable turns most patients into terminal desperate crazies looking for a cure, which is where every wootritionists and doctor woos (not to be confused with that doctorWikipedia's W.svg) jump in with their liver cleanses, hepatoprotective agents, herbal cures that Big Pharma suppresses and so on. None of the cures work.

References[edit]

  1. Do I Need the Hepatitis A and B Vaccines? by Neha Pathak (July 12, 2017) WebMD.
  2. Hepatitis Viruses Volume 59 IARC Monograph Series (1994) International Agency for Research on Cancer.