Information icon.svg Consider taking the RationalWiki Community Survey 2017 or see the results.

Cleveland

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Cleveland is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio, nicknamed the "Mistake by the Lake". The city has historically a strong attraction to woo. It is also the city where disk jockey Alan Freed coined the term "Rock 'n' Roll" while on the air at AM 850 WJW. This was seen as a good enough reason to proclaim Cleveland the Birthplace of Rock and Roll, and then build the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame there.[1]

Cleveland Liberalist[edit]

The Cleveland Liberalist was a weekly newspaper published between 1836-1839, which promoted phrenology as a serious science.

Homeopathy[edit]

See the main article on this topic: Homeopathy

In 1850 the Western Homeopathic College of Cleveland was founded in the city, and was the second such institution established in the United States. It pioneered in both homeopathic nursing, establishing the first nursing school west of the Alleghenies in 1884, and dentistry, forming the first homeopathic school of dentistry in the country in the 1890s. In 1914 the institution amalgamated and became the Cleveland Pulte College of Homeopathy, within the medical school of Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus, Ohio. Due to a funding shortfall, the university formally discontinued the college in 1922, switching to instruct homeopathy by individual doctors on a graduate or postgraduate course basis.

The Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital (May 1856-1917), was founded by Dr. Seth R. Beckwith, and was the first privately owned hospital in Cleveland. It could accommodate 20 patients, mainly sick and injured employees of the Lake Shore and the Cleveland, Columbus, & Cincinnati railroads. The Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital closed in 1919 and reopened later as the Meridia Huron Hospital.

At least today the city has a real hospital in the Cleveland Clinic, which is widely recognized as a world-class institution.

Quack Coffee[edit]

Cleveland is home to one of America's most infamous quack medical doctors — Dr. William Oakley Coffee, also known by the nickname Quack Coffee. He was licensed to practice medicine in 1897, and set up a mail-order business for curing eye diseases, with little more than bottled water as a cure, and charging for it. At Des Moines, he built himself a US$100,000 stone mansion with turrets, porte-cochère and all conveniences. His scam was exposed by investigative journalist Samuel Hopkins Adams in the Collier's Weekly in 1905, in the "Great American Fraud" series of column dispatches. Coffee emerged a year later as an "eye, ear, nose and throat specialist" offering to treat "deafness, head noises from nasal catarrh" by mail order without consultation, and advertised in the major broadsheet newspapers of the day. Despite objections from the American Medical Association, Coffee continued to have his full-page advertisements published for over two decades. Time magazine in October 1926 was critical of the newspapers' continually accepting money to advertise his quack treatments, and ignoring the wishes of the AMA, in an article entitled 'The Press: Quackery'.

Strange laws[edit]

In Cleveland it's illegal to catch mice without a hunting license, and women are forbidden from wearing patent leather shoes, lest men see reflections of their underwear. In the nearby town of Bay Village, it is illegal to walk a cow down Lake Road (US Route 6) on Sundays, a curious ordinance, because the town has not had a working farm since the early 1960s.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. However, the induction ceremony is held in New York City. After all, who wants to travel to Cleveland during the last week of winter?