Information icon.svg Survey Closing: The RationalWiki Community Survey 2017 will close this Friday, November 24th. See the results.

Galileo Was Wrong, The Church Was Right

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
The fault in our stars
Pseudoastronomy
Icon pseudoastronomy.svg
Adding epicycles
Epicyclists
Galileo Was Wrong is a detailed and comprehensive treatment of the scientific evidence supporting Geocentrism, the academic belief that the Earth is immobile in the center of the universe. Garnering scientific information from physics, astrophysics, astronomy and other sciences, Galileo Was Wrong shows that the debate between Galileo and the Catholic Church was much more than a difference of opinion about the interpretation of Scripture.
—Robert Sungenis[1]

Galileo Was Wrong, The Church Was Right is a book which asserts that the geocentric view of the Universe (i.e., the Earth is motionless at the center of the Universe and the Sun orbits around it) espoused by the Catholic Church centuries ago is correct,[2] while Galileo was a hack. No, really. The book was written by Catholic apologists/nutjobs Robert Sungenis and Robert Bennett, and you can buy a copy of it from their website for only $114.00, plus with your purchase, you get a complimentary luncheon at their conference![notes 1]

Criticism[edit]

This book is the work of Satan, written to entice the faithful into perdition with crafty half-truths. The authors manage to get the story partially correct in their explanation of how the sun revolves around the earth, as described in Job 38:4, 1 Samuel 2:8, and Psalm 93:1. Well, good for them. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to observe that the earth is stationary and the sun moves around it, from east to west. No great revelation there. Where the authors fall down on the job is their failure to explain how the earth is flat, another simple observation that anyone can make for themselves just by stepping outside. The authors instead promote the lie that the earth is round, in direct contradiction to Job 38:13, Proverbs 8:27, and Isaiah 48:22. Apparently, Sungenis and Bennett think they know more than God! Don't fall for this blasphemous claptrap. The sun goes around the flat earth, end of story.
—One reviewer, a Poe[2]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Though you may now require a time machine, as the conference was in November 2010.

References[edit]