Talk:Hard-right

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Icon politics.svg

This Politics related article has not received a brainstar for quality. Please consider expanding the article appropriately. See RationalWiki:Article rating for more information.

Steelbrain.png

Problems[edit]

1) Wikipedia seems to consider hard right and far right to be synonyms (Right (disambiguation)Wikipedia's W.svg), contrary to what you have said. 2) If you can more convincingly differentiate these two concepts, then one of your two (or three) examples divorced: Glen Beck. Is opposition to divorce like opposition to abortion for this group, only applying to others? Bongolian (talk) 01:45, 24 August 2019 (UTC)

I think "far right" and "hard right" are synonymous. This terminology, in my view, is the same as what Media Bias/Fact Check calls "borderline extreme right wing" e.g. at this article where they profile Jay Sekulow's ACLJ. Furthermore, Glenn Beck is not a good example unless you want to paint the far right as opportunistic kooks, which is what Beck exemplifies. Cosmikdebris (talk) 01:56, 24 August 2019 (UTC)
That's just due to one Wikipedia editor, who thinks they are the same. No source was provided for considering them to be the same. Of course, disambiguation pages do not usually have sources, so that's not surprising. I will do some more research into how the term "hard right" is actually used by high-quality sources, and who it is used to refer to.--Greenrd (talk) 06:35, 24 August 2019 (UTC)
I disagree with many of Green's edits, however, his page here is well sourced and accurate. I've read a lot of books on the distinction between right-wing populism, ultra-conservatism and far-right. The latter is anti-democratic with authoritarian tendencies, but the former two aren't and are democratic, in fact right-wing populists tend to support direct democracy. Basically, within political science "hard right" would include right-wing populist and ultra-conservative parties that are to the furthest right without being anti-democratic. "Far-right" in contrast includes authoritarian anti-democratic parties, including neo-fascists. There's also "extreme right" as another label that covers the most extreme and violent of the far-right, i.e. neo-Nazi terrorism and white power skinhead groups. Confusingly there's also another term "radical right" that includes the entire right-wing populism to neo-fascist spectrum, so that label is rather misleading and doesn't distinguish between the pro-democratic populists and anti-democratic fascists. Outside of political science, especially in the media, all the above are though commonly called "far right". The media rarely distinguishes between right-wing populists and neo-fascists and labels populists as "far-right". It's also convenient for left-wingers to label right-wing populists "far-right" as a smear. On the other hand, some right-wing populist parties have turned into a far-right direction e.g. UKIP, while other's have tried to moderate their policies and public image, e.g. Swedish Democrats (they had neo-fascist origins, but are now widely thought to be populists and much less extreme), so sometimes the right-wing populist versus far-right distinction is blurry.Trailex (talk) 14:04, 24 August 2019 (UTC)
Using British politics as an example, we can distinguish the so-called "radical" right-wing spectrum as follows: Extreme-right: National Front, Far-right: British National Party, hard-right (right-wing populist): Brexit Party and ultra-conservatives in the Conservative Party like Jacob Rees-Mogg (who often uses populist rhetoric). There's then UKIP who originally were right-wing populist, but have moved into a far-right anti-Islam territory in recent years, which is why Farage left. It would be inaccurate to label the populist Brexit Party and individuals like Mogg (who are pro-democratic), as "far-right"; interestingly since there's a lot of wealthy people in the Brexit party, including Mogg's sister (its current chairman is also a millionaire) they appear to be currently suing politicians or the media who call them "far-right"/"Nazi"/"fascist" etc. Trailex (talk) 14:23, 24 August 2019 (UTC)