RationalWiki's 2020 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff – we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone who saw this today donated $5, we would meet our goal for 2021.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $1680Goal: $3500

Vox (website)

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Cursive letters on a yellow background. The yellow represents the act of highlighting important information, which is done often in their animations and explainations.
You gotta spin it to win it
Media
Icon media.svg
Stop the presses!
We want pictures
of Spider-Man!
Extra! Extra!
We live in a world of too much information and too little context. Too much noise and too little insight. That's where Vox's explainers come in.
—Vox[1]

Vox is American news and opinion website founded in April 2014 by former Washington Post columnist Ezra Klein, former Slate columnist Matthew Yglesias and vice president of growth and analytics Melissa Bell, based on the concept of explanatory journalism.[1] In July 2014, Vox received 8.2 million unique visitors,[2] and in August 2019 Vox's readership was estimated to be more than 33 million visitors.[3] As October 2019, the Vox youtube channel has over 6.72 million subscribers and over 1.5 billion views.[4]

Controversies[edit]

In March 2014, before it had officially launched, Vox was criticized by conservative media commentators, including Erick Erickson, for a video[5] it had published arguing the public debt "isn't a problem right now".[6]

In June 2016, Vox suspended contributor Emmett Rensin for a series of tweets calling for anti-Trump riots, including one that said "If Trump comes to your town, start a riot." [7]

In December 2018, Vox received criticism from fans of PewDiePie for an article written by Aja Romano[8] which alleged that PewDiePie had ties to the alt-right and white supremacism,[9] and even went as far as including Laci Green among a list of "alt-right identified figures" — which she was not too happy about.[10] Romano has said she had received harassment on Twitter, while many of the fans urged PewDiePie to sue Vox.[9]

Reception[edit]

  • Media Bias/Fact Check labels Vox with a left bias and "Mostly Factual" reporting.[11]
  • AllSides rates Vox with a left bias.[12]
  • ad fontes media rates Vox with a reliabilty score of 41.97 (out of 64, above 32 are good) and bias score of -8.75 (-42 to 42, negative socres being more left).[13]

References[edit]

External links[edit]