RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2951Goal: $5000

Doctors Health Press

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Against allopathy
Alternative medicine
Icon alt med alt.svg
Unproven articles

Doctors Health Press is a website promoting alternative medicine and Big Pharma conspiracy theories.[1] Its many articles are usually about "a new study" showing some "natural" treatment to be effective, or about some artificial chemical being harmuful. (For example, see the article "This extract shown to Kill Cancer Cells". Note its vagueness and complete lack of references.) They claim their newsletter has 200,000 subscribers.[2]

They also sell health books[3] and subscriptions to various paper newsletters of theirs.[4][1][5]

Claims[edit]

Some of the claims they make include:

  • Big Pharma, the medical establishment, and the powers that be are trying to stop you from finding about the miracle that is homeopathy[6] — it's a good thing Doctors Health Press is here to speak out against the conspiracy! Of course, the conspirators aren't doing a particularly good job at hiding homeopathy, since it's frequently in the news, people talk about it all the time, and practicing homeopathists can be found pretty much everywhere (unfortunately), none of which is attributable to the actions of Doctors Health Press.
  • You, too, can live to be 122 like Jeanne Calment by taking resveratrol, a natural compound found in red grape skin![7] But wait, that's not all: Doctors Health Press has an even better compound called pterostilbene, which they will graciously sell bottles of to you with loads of free gifts.


External links[edit]

References[edit]