RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2951Goal: $5000

Homo ergaster

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Partial-reconstruction of an H. ergaster fossil skull
We're all homos here
Evolution
Icon evolution.svg
Relevant Hominidae
A Gradual Science
Plain Monkey Business

Homo ergaster was similar to Homo erectus and may have been an African subspecies of H. erectus or a distinct species; palaeontologists are not sure. H. ergaster lived less than two million years ago.

Comparison with other homo types[edit]

H. ergaster had several features found in modern humans and may have been a direct ancestor. [1]. The pelvis of H. ergaster was narrow as in modern humans and the rib cage had a modern human shape. The narrow pelvis caused problems for mothers giving birth. The brain of the newborn evolved to be undeveloped so the head was small enough to pass through the narrow pelvis and the nuclear family may have come into being as mothers needed additional support caring for their undeveloped infants. One specimen of H. ergaster had ‘narrow cheek teeth’ and, ‘a smaller dental arcade’ suggesting that food was processed with stones and needed less chewing. The brain of H. ergaster was larger than that of typical H. erectus and tools found with H. ergaster were more advanced.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Homo heidelbergensis has also been suggested as our direct ancestor