RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3383Goal: $5000

Protoscience

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Style over substance
Pseudoscience
Icon pseudoscience.svg
Popular pseudosciences
Random examples

Protosciences are fields of study that existed before the modern scientific method was established[1] before developing into proper science. They were often concerned as much with occultism or religion as with natural phenomena. Continuing to hold belief in a protoscience that has been discredited in favor of a modern scientific field is considered pseudoscience. In a broader sense, much of science could also fall under the term "protoscience". If a field of study is consistent with existing science, but has not yet been tested rigorously by the scientific method, because it is still in its formative years, then that protoscience (read: not-yet-science) is to be distinguished from pseudoscience (read: never-science). Technically speaking, all science could be a protoscience: you never know if tomorrow, something new will be found which utterly shakes the foundations of science and creates a paradigm shift (kind of like what radium did a century ago).

Examples of past protosciences include

Modern protosciences may or may not include things such as artificial intelligence, ball lightning, quantum computing, string theory, astrobiology and memetics. By definition, we can only speculate on what these will lead to, as future scientific discoveries must be unknown in the present. Stay tuned.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. We can't say for sure when exactly, but a good guess would be 1620 with Francis Bacon's Novum Organum.