Difference between revisions of "Conspiracy"

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (See also: It looks better this way.)
(My God, I've become Wikipedia. I'm linking articles with no relevancy to the subject matter—*just* to show that we have them. Pardon me while I berate myself for doing what I despise about Wikipedia.)
Line 6: Line 6:
 
Some people conspire to make [[Conservapedia]] look more foolish than it already is.  They are referred to as "[[terrorism|terrorists]]" or "heroes of freedom", depending on the source.
 
Some people conspire to make [[Conservapedia]] look more foolish than it already is.  They are referred to as "[[terrorism|terrorists]]" or "heroes of freedom", depending on the source.
  
There have been very famous conspiracies, like the Gunpowder Plot (unsuccessful), and the [[9/11]] attack on prominent [[United States|U.S.]] landmarks (3/4 successful).  There was also a "conspiracy", in the sense that the details were kept only among those involved, to get [[creationism]] taught in U.S. public schools as [[science]], by covertly identifying candidates for school boards to local sympathetic religious groups in order to turn out a strong vote for them, which achieved success, followed by embarrassment.
+
There have been very famous conspiracies, like the Gunpowder Plot (unsuccessful), and the [[9/11]] attack on prominent [[United States|U.S.]] landmarks (3/4 successful).  There was also a "conspiracy", in the sense that the details were kept only among those involved, to get [[creationism]] taught in U.S. [[public education|public schools]] as [[science]], by covertly identifying candidates for school boards to local sympathetic [[religion|religious]] groups in order to turn out a strong vote for them, which achieved success, followed by embarrassment.
  
When an event occurs which is not alleged to have been a conspiracy by authorities or investigators, sometimes a "[[conspiracy theory]]", or several, will develop around it.  One classic is the [[John F. Kennedy]] assassination, another, newer one is the aforementioned attack of 9/11.  Another (relatively) recent one is the so-called "vast right-wing conspiracy", invoked in the 1990s by then-First Lady [[Hillary Clinton]] to explain the attacks on her husband, President [[Bill Clinton]].
+
When an event occurs which is not alleged to have been a conspiracy by authorities or investigators, sometimes a "[[conspiracy theory]]", or several, will develop around it.  One classic is the [[John F. Kennedy]] assassination, another, newer one is the aforementioned attack of 9/11.  Another (relatively) recent one is the so-called "vast right-wing conspiracy", invoked in the 1990s by then-First Lady [[Hillary Clinton]] to explain the attacks on her husband, [[President of the United States|President]] [[Bill Clinton]].
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 06:48, 12 February 2009

Not just a river in Egypt
Denialism
Icon denialism.svg
♫ We're not listening ♫

A conspiracy is a secret plan to effect some goal. Its members are known as conspirators.

Not everyone involved in a conspiracy necessarily knows all the details; in fact, sometimes none do.

Some people conspire to make Conservapedia look more foolish than it already is. They are referred to as "terrorists" or "heroes of freedom", depending on the source.

There have been very famous conspiracies, like the Gunpowder Plot (unsuccessful), and the 9/11 attack on prominent U.S. landmarks (3/4 successful). There was also a "conspiracy", in the sense that the details were kept only among those involved, to get creationism taught in U.S. public schools as science, by covertly identifying candidates for school boards to local sympathetic religious groups in order to turn out a strong vote for them, which achieved success, followed by embarrassment.

When an event occurs which is not alleged to have been a conspiracy by authorities or investigators, sometimes a "conspiracy theory", or several, will develop around it. One classic is the John F. Kennedy assassination, another, newer one is the aforementioned attack of 9/11. Another (relatively) recent one is the so-called "vast right-wing conspiracy", invoked in the 1990s by then-First Lady Hillary Clinton to explain the attacks on her husband, President Bill Clinton.

See also