Information icon.svg Voting is completed for the RationalWiki 2021 Moderator Election and the results are now posted.
Congratulations to the winners!

Doomsday Clock

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
How the sausage is made
Politics
Icon politics.svg
Theory
Practice
Philosophies
Terms
As usual
Country sections
United States politics British politics Chinese politics French politics Indian politics Israeli politics Japanese politics South Korean politics
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes.
Who watches the watchmen?
—Quoted as the epigraph of the Tower Commision Report, 1987
The clock's current setting.

The Doomsday Clock is a device maintained by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists at the University of Chicago which is used to indicate the threat of a nuclear, biological, or environmental disaster. It is a clock face, where midnight represents a nuclear war, and noon represents world peace. It has been "operational" since 1947 when it first appeared on the cover of the Bulletin, where it has appeared ever since. It has changed 24 times since 1947, moving forwards 16 times whilst moving backwards 8 times. The lowest time it reached was 11:43, following the signing of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. It was previously closest to midnight during 1953, after the US and the USSR tested their thermonuclear weapons, where it read 11:58.[1]

Timeline[edit]

Graph of the changes to the Doomsday Clock time since 1947. Note: The lower the graph becomes, the higher the probability of catastrophe is deemed to be.

In recent times, the clock has been changing for the worse, albeit slowly. On January 22, 2015, it was set "3 minutes to midnight", due to "unchecked climate change, global nuclear weapons modernizations, and outsized nuclear weapons arsenals", and the failure of "international leaders" to do anything about it.[2] In January 2017, it was set "2.5 minutes to midnight", due to Donald Trump.[3] The clock changed in January 2018, when it was again set "2 minutes to midnight"—a level unseen since 1953—mostly due to Donald Trump once more.[4] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists said it saw an increase in dangers to humanity, from climate change to nuclear warfare.[5] On January 23rd, 2020, the clock was set 100 seconds to midnight, the closest the clock had ever been to midnight.[6] The clock's time was reaffirmed on January 27th, 2021, consequently the clock is still 100 seconds to midnight.[7]

The worst part regarding all of this is that nobody seems to acknowledge nor care about these solemn warnings.

A different kind of clock, counting towards a different kind of doom
It would be a stronger world, a stronger loving world, to die in.
—John Cale

See also[edit]

External Links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "Doomsday Clock Timeline." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 9 Sept 2009, http://www.thebulletin.org/content/doomsday-clock/timeline Doomsday Clock Timeline.
  2. Mecklin, John. "Press release: It is now 3 minutes to midnight." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, https://thebulletin.org/2015/01/press-release-it-is-now-3-minutes-to-midnight/. Accessed 4 February 2015.
  3. Chappell, Bill. "The Doomsday Clock Is Reset: Closest To Midnight Since The 1950s." National Public Radio, https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/26/511592700/the-doomsday-clock-is-now-30-seconds-closer-to-midnight. Accessed 26 January 2017.
  4. Borger, Julian. "Doomsday Clock ticked forward 30 seconds to 2 minutes to midnight." The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/25/doomsday-clock-ticked-forward-trump-nuclear-weapons-climate-change. Accessed 6 October 2021.
  5. "2018 Doomsday Clock Statement." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 26 Jan 2018, https://thebulletin.org/2018-doomsday-clock-statement]
  6. Mecklin, John. "2020 Doomsday Clock Statement." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, https://thebulletin.org/doomsday-clock/2020-doomsday-clock-statement/. Accessed 26 March 2020.
  7. Mecklin, John. "2021 Doomsday Clock Statement." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, https://thebulletin.org/doomsday-clock/current-time/. Accessed 29 July 2021.