RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3234Goal: $5000

Friends of Science

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Not just a river in Egypt
Denialism
Icon denialism.svg
♫ We're not listening ♫

"Friends" of Science (FoS) is a global warming denialist pressure group based in Calgary, Canada.

Website[edit]

The website, friendsofscience.org, contains a listing of discredited denialist talking points. Their primary position is that the sun is the main driver of climate change,[1] despite the fact that solar activity has been inversely correlated with the recent warming trend.[2] In 2014, the organization launched a billboard campaign based on this talking point.[3] The site also contains a list of alleged climate "myths." For example, they claim that the "hockey stick graph" has been "debunked" by Steve McIntyre and Ross McKitrick.[4]

Denialist associations[edit]

Friends of Science maintains associations with some prominent climate deniers. Their scientific advisory board currently includes Chris de Freitas,[5] who played a key role in the Soon and Baliunas controversy. De Freitas was an editor of the Climate Review, where he helped to get a flawed review paper published that denied 20th century warming. A number of editors resigned over this controversy. The advisory board at one time included Sallie Baliunas herself, as well as McKitrick. The board also included Tim Ball, who is notable for his complete lack of climatology credentials.[6][7] FoS helped to organize Christopher Monckton's 2009 "Apocalypse Cancelled" Canadian lecture tour.[8]

Science Education Fund controversy[edit]

In 2005, Barry Cooper, a political scientist at the University of Calgary (U of C), set up the Science Education Fund to donate money to Friends of Science. The money was funneled through the Calgary Foundation, which accepts anonymous donations. However, Cooper himself has admitted that "There were some oil companies" involved in the funding, but that the donations were "not exclusively from the oil and gas industry." While Cooper has attempted to associate Friends of Science with the university, U of C distanced itself from the organization.[9] A 2007 investigation by U of C led the university to return donations from the Science Education Fund when university officials discovered its status as a denialist organization promoting "partisan views on climate change."[10]

External links[edit]

References[edit]