RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3630Goal: $5000

William Fix

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
It's fun to pretend
Paranormal
Icon ghost.svg
Fails from the crypt

William Fix is a paranormal author and disciple of Edgar Cayce.

Biography[edit]

Fix has an M.A. degree in behavioral science from Simon Fraser University and is the author of several books promoting the paranormal. He has also written books about Edgar Cayce and has translated some of his works.

Evolution[edit]

Fix is most well known for his book The Bone Peddlers: Selling Evolution (1984) in which he proposed the concept of "psychogenesis," which posits that humans started off as spirits but slowly descended into matter. This occult idea was first put forward by the psychic Edgar Cayce.[1]

Fix described the theory as a form of spiritual evolution; however, it is actually a creationist idea as it rejects evolution and naturalistic processes. The first half of Bone Peddlers rejected common descent and evolution based on the fossil record and the back half discussed psychogenesis from paranormal and parapsychology studies. Fix believed that humans obtained their material bodies through psychokinesis. He also claimed that humans can cause objects to materialise just by thinking about them.

Fix and creationists[edit]

Bone Peddlers has been quote mined and lied about by hundreds of creationists, who have tried to use Fix to prove that evolution is a "theory in crisis" that even secular non-Christian scientists are turning away from. Fix, however, is not a scientist nor a secularist, but an occultist, and the back half of his book discusses reincarnation, out-of-body experiences, psychokinesis, spirits, and extrasensory perception. All of these are things that are deemed "heretical" by orthodox Christianity and "woo" by scientists and secularists, yet Fix believes that all of them are real.[2] The fact that creationists quote from Fix and use him as a "secular" ally, while remaining silent on the paranormal and occult ideas that actually informed his rejection of evolution, speaks volumes about their total lack of scientific and moral integrity.

In an article titled The Evolution Deceit, Muslim creationist Harun Yahya quote mined Fix's book, lying about Fix by calling him an "evolutionist biologist".[3] Yahya might want to look up the definition of deceit, as he fits it very well.

Interestingly, Fix's ideas about human origins are exactly the same as those found in Hare Krishna creationism.[4]

Publications[edit]

  • Star Maps: Astonishing New Evidence from Ancient Civilizations and Modern Scientific Research of Man's Origins and Return to the Stars (1979)
  • Pyramid Odyssey (1984)
  • The Bone Peddlers: Selling Evolution (1984)
  • Lake of Memory Rising: Return of the Five Ancient Truths at the Heart of Religion (2000)
  • Edgar Cayce (2006)

References[edit]

  1. Psychogenesis — Edgar Cayce's Cosmology
  2. Review: The Bone Peddlers
  3. Creationist lying about Fix
  4. Michael Cremo (2003). Human Devolution: A Vedic alternative to Darwin's theory. Bhaktivedanta Book Publishing.