RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2835Goal: $5000

Bastyr University

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Bastyr University's Washington campus
Against allopathy
Alternative medicine
Icon alt med alt.svg
Unproven articles

Bastyr University (BU) is a university an academic institution an establishment that teaches naturopathic medicine. In other words, Bastyr teaches quackery and can be considered a "woo-niversity." Bastyr has campuses in Kenmore, Washington and San Diego, California. Bastyr is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU).[1][2]

Bastyr offers degrees in several naturopathic specialties, including herbal sciences, health psychology, exercise science, Human Biology, nutrition and culinary arts, and acupuncture. They also offer a doctorate in naturopathic medicine, a Doctor of Acupuncture Medicine and a Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.[3]

Bastyr operates a comprehensive research program exploring the application of naturopathic medical practices.[4] A typical research area focuses on "mind/body medicine, acupuncture, botanical medicine and nutritional support" for cancer patients. [5] Basically they are researching predetermined conclusions with results that point to evidence of effectiveness.

Bastyr has faced criticism for teaching pseudoscience and quackery, as their course offerings in homeopathy, herbalism, acupuncture, and Ayurvedic methods lack compelling evidence for efficacy.[6][7][8][9]

The most important distinction between naturopathic school and medical school is that pseudoscience is essential to the naturopathic curriculum. I took classes in homeopathy, naturopathic manipulation, hydrotherapy, Chinese medicine, botanical medicine, and naturopathic theory and philosophy. Bastyr taught alternative vaccine schedules, and various energy healing cures like Bach flower remedies, as well as therapeutic touch.
—Britt Hermes, naturopathic apostate[10]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Bastyr University Accreditation & Compliance. bastyr.edu. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  2. Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, Directory of Institutions. nwccu.org. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  3. Bastyr University Academics. bastyr.edu. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  4. Bastyr University Research. bastyr.edu. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  5. Bastyr Integrative Oncology Research. bastyr.edu. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  6. Kimball C Atwood, IV. Naturopathy, Pseudoscience, and Medicine: Myths and Fallacies vs Truth. MedGenMed. 2004; 6(1): 33. 26 March 2004. nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  7. Britt Hermes. ND Confession, Part 1: Clinical training inside and out. sciencebasedmedicine.org. 13 March 2015. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  8. Eugenie V. Mielczarek and Brian D. Engler. Selling Pseudoscience: A Rent in the Fabric of American Medicine. Skeptical Inquirer 38.3. May/June 2014. csicop.org. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  9. Kimball C. Atwood. The Ongoing Problem with the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Skeptical Inquirer 25.7. September/October 2003. csicop.org. Retrieved on 30 October 2015.
  10. http://www.naturopathicdiaries.com/price-of-naturopathic-education/