RationalWiki's 2020 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff – we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone who saw this today donated $5, we would meet our goal for 2021.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2120Goal: $3500

Rashid Buttar

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Against allopathy
Alternative medicine
Icon alt med alt.svg
Clinically unproven
The conditions required to be a customer of Dr Rashid Buttar. *yawn*

Dr. Rashid Ali Buttar is a osteopathic physician[1] who, apart from his (now redacted) genuine qualifications, espouses a line of treatment for autism that is as bereft of scientific rigor as necromancy. He also engages in cancer woo-driven alternative medical treatment,[2] (e.g. he is listed as "Director of Clinical Research and Development" at DIIL[3] who make the BX Protocol cure-all).

He enjoys, as do a large number of pseudoscience promoters, a loyalty from his followers[4] built on nothing but charisma and anecdote,[5] neither of which has ever been demonstrated to effect the cure of anything except spare cash needed for essentials.

Trouble with law[edit]

Due to his "unconventional treatments", Dr. Buttar has been under several investigations from the North Carolina State Medical Board for about a decade, an entity which he regards as a "rabid dog".[6] The investigations have been for a variety of misconducts involving autistic children and cancer patients. This has resulted in his medical license being restricted,[7] though in reality it amounted to little more than a slap on the wrist.[8][9]

  • In 2007, Buttar was brought before the North Carolina Board of Medical Examiners after providing crank therapies to four cancer patients. Three of those patients later died from it.[10][11][12][13]
Duckhead.gif Quackwatch says: Rashid Buttar Charged with Unprofessional Conduct[14]
Rashid A. Buttar, D.O., who operates the Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research in central North Carolina, has been charged with exploiting four patients by charging exorbitant fees for worthless tests and treatments. The complaint (shown below) states:
  • All four patients received frequent, expensive treatments that had no recognized scientific evidence of any validity whatsoever on almost a daily basis without any evidence of sustained improvement.
  • To drive up costs, Buttar ordered lab work and other tests that had no rational, medical relationship to the patients’ diagnoses.
  • Three of the patients had cancers that eventually killed them. They received intravenous treatments with various substances that have no known value for the treatment of cancer. The substances included EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), chromium, certain vitamins, and hydrogen peroxide. The total fees for these patients ranged from about $25,000 to $32,000.
  • The fourth patient, who had a history colon polyps, was not seen by Buttar but had chelation therapy administered by a clinic nurse practitioner.

The North Carolina Medical Board has scheduled a hearing on these charges in February 2008. Buttar is Chairman of the American Board of Clinical Metal Toxicology (ABCMT) and president of the North Carolina Integrative Medical Society (NCIMS). The ABMCT, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties. “certifies” chelation therapists. The NCIMS was formed in 2003 with the hope of protecting “integrative” doctors from disciplinary action by the state medical board.

  • Buttar has been criticized for his use of unproven therapies, such as topical cream containing chelators to treat children with autism, and for his use of hydrogen peroxide and EDTA to treat cancer.[15][16]
Duckhead.gif Quackwatch says: Rashid Buttar Charged with Exploiting Cancer Patients[17]
In September 2009, in two separate complaints, the North Carolina Medical Board accused Rashid A. Buttar, D.O. of exploiting a total of eight pages. One complaint, shown below, accuses him of charging cancer patients exorbitant fees for worthless tests and treatments. The other complaint accuses him of mistreating four patients whom he falsely diagnosed with heavy metal toxicity.

Buttar operates the Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research in central North Carolina. He is also chairman of the American Board of Clinical Metal Toxicology (ABCMT) and president of the North Carolina Integrative Medical Society (NCIMS). The ABMCT, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, “certifies” chelation therapists. The NCIMS was formed in 2003 with the hope of protecting “integrative” doctors from disciplinary action by the state medical board.

  • He came to public attention in 2009 when he alleged to have successfully used chelation therapy to treat Desiree Jennings, a Washington Redskins cheerleading ambassador who had made dubious claims about suffering from dystonia and losing her ability to walk or talk normally after receiving a flu shot.[18][19][20][21]
  • In 2010, the FDA sent Buttar a warning letter for illegally marketing unapproved topical creams as drugs via his websites, YouTube videos, and radio appearances.[15][22] FDA inspections also revealed that Buttar's company, V-SAB Medical Labs, had not complied with good manufacturing practices and that its products were adulterated according to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.[23] The full warning along with the refutations of his cures can be found here.
  • In 2010, the North Carolina Medical Board reprimanded Buttar.
Duckhead.gif Quackwatch says: Rashid Buttar Reprimanded[24]
Rashid A. Buttar, D.O., who operates the Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research in central North Carolina, has signed a consent order (shown below) under which he agreed to (a) be reprimanded, (b) obey all laws and all rules and regulations involving medical practice, and (c) to provide an informed consent form that includes language specified in an attachment to the order.

The agreement was a compromise in which Buttar acknowledged that his treatment of an out-of state autistic child whom he had never examined had been illegal and the North Carolina Medical Board agreed that the agreement would resolve all other pending complaints against him, which included concerns about seven patients that were mentioned in two Notices of Charges filed in 2009.

The consent form (shown below) includes acknowledgements that treatments that Dr. Buttar prescribes have not been proven effective and that, “the possible adverse effects . . . include, but are not limited to, infection, phlebitis, headaches, dizziness, hypoglycemia, electrolyte imbalance, mineral depletion, fatigue, kidney failure, or even death.”

  • In 2011, as a result of the disciplinary action in North Carolina, the Hawaii Medical Board denied Buttar a medical license.[25]
  • In 2019, the North Carolina Medical Board disciplined Buttar after receiving two complaints. In one case, a physician was worried that Buttar's treatment of a cancer patient hindered appropriate treatment and increased the patient's pain and suffering. In the other case, Buttar admitted that his personal relationship with the parent of a young patient constituted a boundary violation. Buttar and the Medical Board settled the complaints in a Consent Order that included a reprimand and a requirement to take courses in ethics and record keeping. Buttar acknowledged that his conduct constituted "unprofessional conduct including, but not limited to, departure from or the failure to conform to the ethics of the profession." Additionally, regarding the cancer patient, Buttar acknowledged that his documentation of care "failed to conform to the standards of acceptable and prevailing medical practice".[26]

You would think at this point it would have been safe to classify him as a serial killer, ruining many lives with his quack cures for profit, but since he has become a major player in the anti-vaccination movement, it seems he isn’t going to jail very soon despite his extensive criminal record.

Views[edit]

  • 5G is a weapon designed to knock out our immune system so that the coronavirus kills you as deliberate attempt to depopulate us.[27]
  • The COVID-19 virus was engineered in a US laboratory and that prominent individuals such as Bill Gates and Dr Anthony Fauci form an integral part of this devious scheme.[28]

Requirements to be Rashid Buttar’s patient[edit]

There are a total 34 conditions that you must abide by to become a patient of Buttar. No one has the time to read all of them, so here are a few selected ones.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research (archived from 8 Jul 2013 21:07:05 UTC)
  2. http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2007/12/10/dr-rashid-buttar-the-medical-board-is-a/
  3. Dr Buttar's listing on the DIIL/BX-Protocol website.
  4. Including, it seems, Dan Burton: http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2012/02/01/goodbye-and-good-riddance-to-organized-q/
  5. https://web.archive.org/web/20120626181417/http://www.defeatautismyesterday.com/Buttar.htm
  6. Quoth Dr. Rashid Buttar: "The medical board is a 'rabid dog'"
  7. Rashid Buttar's going down: The North Carolina Board of Medical Examiners finally acts
  8. Beware, North Carolina. Beware. Dr. Rashid Buttar is free to practice medicine.
  9. Major fail by medical regulators: Dr. Rashid Buttar given slap on the wrist
  10. Fitzpatrick, Michael (2008). Defeating Autism: A Damaging Delusion. Routledge. pp. 63–64. ISBN 9781134058983. 
  11. Transcript of Buttar in court
  12. Garloch, Karen. (April 25, 2008). "Medical panel: Restrict doctor, The Charlotte Observor. Archived from the original on May 7, 2008.
  13. "Huntersville doctor accepts reprimand, keeps unorthodox work" (March 31, 2010). WBTV. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  14. Rashid Buttar Charged with Unprofessional Conduct
  15. 15.0 15.1 Szabo, Liz (18 June 2013). "Book raises alarms about alternative medicine". USA Today. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  16. Atwood KC; Woeckner E; Baratz RS; Sampson WI (May 13, 2008). "Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) should be abandoned". Medscape J Med 10 (5): 115. PMC 2438277. PMID 18596934. 
  17. Rashid Buttar Charged with Exploiting Cancer Patients
  18. Hamblin, James (17 September 2014). "There Is No "Alternative Medicine"". The Atlantic. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  19. The Needle and the Damage (Not) Done (May 1, 2020) Discover
  20. "Real? A Hoax? Or Something Else? Did A Flu Shot Cause Woman To Get Dystonia? To Be Broadcast Thursday, February 4th". Inside Edition. February 4, 2010. Retrieved May 1, 2020. 
  21. "Flu Shot Woman". Inside Edition. February 4, 2010. Retrieved May 1, 2020. 
  22. "FDA Warning Letter to Rashid Buttar, D.O. (13-ATL-15)". Department of Health and Human Services. November 25, 2013. Retrieved May 1, 2020. 
  23. "FDA Warns Boehringer, V-SAB Of Manufacturing Practice Violations". Bloomberg Law. May 21, 2013. Retrieved May 1, 2020. 
  24. Rashid Buttar Reprimanded
  25. "Licensee Information, Rashid Ali Buttar". Retrieved 2 May 2020. 
  26. "Consent Order, In re Rashid Ali Buttar". 6 February 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2020. 
  27. Covid-19 Virus Conspiracy? 5G, Immunity and Corona Virus: Part 4 - Dr. Rashid A. Buttar, Youtube
  28. OPINION | The Covid-19 'infodemic' and why conspiracy theories are extremely dangerous Faadiel Essop, News24