RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3383Goal: $5000

Linda Moulton Howe

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Linda Moulton Howe posing with her 1981 Scottsdale, AZ Regional Emmy Award (not a national Emmy as she sometimes neglects to mention) for A Strange Harvest
The woo is out there
UFOlogy
Icon ufology.svg
Aliens did it...
... and ran away
Some dare call it
Conspiracy
Icon conspiracy.svg
What THEY don't want
you to know!
Sheeple wakers

Linda Moulton Howe (born 1942) is a ufologist and "investigative journalist". Among other things, she claims that in 1983 she was shown a secret presidential briefing paper that revealed how "extraterrestrials created Jesus" and placed him on earth "to teach mankind about love and non-violence."[1]

Career[edit]

Initially focusing on an environmentalist message, she quickly turned to UFOs and associated phenomena, leading to what is probably her best known work, the 1980 documentary A Strange Harvest, about cattle mutilations that she concludes are unusual animal deaths caused by "non-human intelligence and technology".[2] She claims to have seen secret government documents that prove aliens are annoying the human race by mutilating cattle, abducting people, and zooming around military bases in flying saucers.[3] Howe (in collusion with radio host Art Bell) once vigorously promoted an ordinary hunk of metal as "debris from the Roswell crash", claiming it was a "mystery metal" unlike any seen on earth.[4]

She runs her own website called "EarthFiles.com" where, for a measly $45 a year, you can access her body of work. Linda will follow pretty much any lead or phone call if it involves UFOs, ancient aliens, crop circles and environmentalist conspiracies (eg. colony collapse disorder and Monsanto). To her credit, she will occasionally ask real scientists for opinions on these matters, but will then promptly dismiss or rationalise them away. She regularly appears on the Coast to Coast AM radio show and the Ancient Aliens TV series.

She coined the catch phrase "high strangeness" to describe the focus of her Weekly World News-ish style of journalism.

Credibility[edit]

Her gullibility and deceptive "reports" have caused even staunch Ufologists to give her extremely low marks for credibility.[5]

Someone once summed up Howe very well with two words: ' Media entrepreneur '. While having been a major player in the cattle mutilation mystery, Howe's credibility has gone way down hill as she sensationalizes everything from mundane animal deaths to promoting Brazilian UFO fraud Urandir Oliveira and the Aztec UFO Crash Hoax while selling alien books, videos and lectures. Howe dabbles in all things strange including Bigfoot, crop circles, alien abductions, and UFOs. Howe also sits on the board of advisors to the Roswell UFO Museum along with the likes of Don Schmitt. See Howe's site, which she actually charges a subscription for in order to access some stories. Also see Howe turning an explained animal death into an encounter with Bigfoot. A leap not even Bigfoot itself could make.
—UFO.watchdog.com[6]
The most hilarious web posting we have read in a very long time comes from Whitley Strieber's "Unknown Country", dated 9/30/05. Linda Moulton Howe is described as "our Dreamland science reporter". We ask — what, if any, are the scientific qualifications of this pleasant but extremely gullible lady?? Inquiring minds would like to know!
—Saucer Smear, Vol. 52, Issue No. 10

Radio[edit]

Howe's "reports" for radio program hosts such as Art Bell, George Noory and Whitley Streiber cover an astonishing range of woo subjects that appeal to UFO enthusiasts, conspiracy theorists, and the Second Coming crowd.[7] Examples:

  • "Bigfoot DNA" — Howe says Melba Ketchum has proof that Bigfoot exists.
  • "Strange Explosions Sweeping the US" — Howe describes alleged booms, flashes of light, ominous trumpet sounds.
  • "Animal Mutilations Strike Again" — Howe says it's happening in Waddy, Kentucky.
  • "The Return of Ezekiel's Wheel" — Howe describes recent "eyewitness sightings" of that Biblical thing in the sky.
  • "Pyramids Discovered in Alaska and Turkey" — According to Howe, they are "immense structures not only built, but used in some unknown way for a thousand years."
  • "Unexplained Explosions Now Worldwide" — Howe says the world is blowing up, supposedly starting with Clintonville, Wisconsin.
  • "Missing Time" — Howe scoops "a rare case of documented missing time".
  • "Unknown objects in our skies. What are we NOT being told" — Yes, there's an Obama conspiracy to deny UFO presence, according to Howe.
  • "Kansas City UFO Wave" — Howe says a "remarkable series of UFO sightings" are being debunked by the media due to some kind of conspiracy.
  • "The Rendlesham Code" — Howe endorses a UFO contactee's claims of having telepathically downloaded binary code numbers from aliens.
  • "Unprecedented Wave of Animal Mutilations" — Howe warns of a "massive worldwide wave" of hacked-up animals.
  • Project Serpo — Howe was one of the first to be taken for a ride by this hoax. As of 2017, she is still saying, with a straight face, that Ebens are our allies in some sort of galactic war.

External links[edit]

References[edit]