RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2397Goal: $5000

Shadow people

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
It's fun to pretend
Paranormal
Icon ghost.svg
Fails from the crypt

Shadow people are supposedly supernatural beings that believers claim to see flitting about in their peripheral vision. While various creatures of this ilk have long been a staple of folklore and ghost stories, the modern iteration gained popularity from the discussions of Heidi Hollis on Coast to Coast AM radio talk show, in 2002.

Origin[edit]

"Honey, I'm home!"

The modern idea of the shadow people gained traction when paranormal author Heidi Hollis appeared on the Coast to Coast AM radio talk show around 2002 to promote the existence of shadowy negative beings whose purpose, she said, was to annoy, scare, or harm people.[1][2] Radio host and skilled crank enabler[3] Art Bell had been independently endorsing belief in "shadow people" for some time already.[4] Bell helpfully encouraged his listeners to reinterpret personal experiences of sleep paralysis, pareidolia and hallucination as genuine encounters with malevolent supernatural beings. Soon hundreds of callers flooded his switchboard, convinced that they too were being stalked by shadow people. Hollis was promptly enshrined as a regular guest on Coast to Coast AM and the term "shadow people" was firmly lodged in the pantheon of pop culture batshit.[5][6] Poor Wikipedia, burdened by its neutral point of view, was once compelled to treat the subject as a credible phenomenon. [7]

Claims[edit]

Other opportunistic scammers authors quickly jumped on the bandwagon to add their own "knowledge" to Hollis's, er, "discovery". Shadow people, they said, were actually naughty extraterrestrial entities such as reptilian lizards and grey aliens that could choke or suffocate sleepers, and one especially fashionable example called "the Hat Man" rather enjoyed dressing like Zorro with a three piece suit under his cape. Others claimed that shadow people were time travelers, visitors from other dimensions, astral travelers, or just plain old demons. Hollis wrote in her 2001 book The Secret War that shadow people were evil spirits engaged in a battle with God, and only through prayer could one avoid their attentions. (Not surprisingly, her follow-up book was entitled Jesus is No Joke.)[8] Hollis maintains that shadow people can also take the form of headless torsos, cats, bugs, streaks, and blobs.[9] Why so many conflicting descriptions? Shadow people, say believers, are endowed with the magical ability to disappear before someone can get a good look at them. The best that perhaps be said about that explanation is that it's a convenient one.[10]

Rational Explanations[edit]

Being shadows, or even just blobs of darkness, it's not hard to imagine that many cases are hallucinations or simple cases of apophenia. Many reports claim that these creatures are seen "out of the corner of one's eye", or peripheral vision. Peripheral vision still maintains the ability to recognize patterns so it's likely that many just misinterpret shadows to be faces or bodies. [11] It's also possible that hallucinations of this nature result from hypnogogia, a sleep condition similar to lucid dreaming where someone is able to perceive their surroundings, but still suggestible to ideas in their subconscious.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]