RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2835Goal: $5000

Pepe the Frog

From RationalWiki
(Redirected from Kek)
Jump to: navigation, search
Someone is wrong on
The Internet
Icon internet.svg
Log in:

Pepe the Frog is a green anthropomorphic frog used as an Internet meme. The character was created by artist Matt Furie in his comic Boy's Club.[1] In 2008 its popularity grew steadily grew across Myspace and Gaia OnlineWikipedia's W.svg, being popularised by 4chan in the same period.[2] By 2015, it had even become one of the most popular memes used on Tumblr, the residence of its current nemesis, the SJW.[3]

While originally without political associations, as of 2015 he has become associated with the alt-right, white nationalism, and Donald Trump (though it doesn't mean everyone using or liking this meme is a nationalist).[4] Hillary Clinton's campaign condemned both Donald Trump and his son for posting images of Pepe on Twitter.[5]

The Anti-Defamation League has listed Pepe as a hate symbol, but noted that most instances of Pepe were not used in a hate-related context.[6] Matt Furie tried getting his frog back,[7] but was forced to concede defeat. In May 2017, he killed off the character,[8] but Pepe could not be so easily and permanently slain, and has returned to us.[9]

Some claim that Pepe is the incarnation of the ancient Egyptian god Kek (also known as Kuk[10] or Keku), and worship him as such as part of another 4chan in-joke called the "Cult of Kek",[11] which has been defined by the experts at Wikipedia as a parody religion.[12] The connection between Pepe and Kek has been endorsed by the neoreactionary philosopher Nick Land,[13] and by Davis Aurini.[14]

Fun fact: an unrelated Spanish restaurant by the name Casa Pepe gives customers the opurtunity to "relive the glory of General Franco's brutal fascist dictatorship" by perusing "bottles of wine honouring General Francisco Franco on their labels, cured Spanish hams and olive oil cans bearing the national flag used during Franco's reign, berets and other Fascist paraphernalia."[15]

Take a peep at these Pepes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Khan, Imad (April 12, 2015). "4chan's Pepe the Frog is bigger than ever—and his creator feels good, man". The Daily Dot. 
  2. Kiberd, Roisin (April 9, 2015). "4chan's Frog Meme Went Mainstream, So They Tried to Kill It". Motherboard. Vice Media. 
  3. Hathaway, Jay (December 9, 2015). "Tumblr's Biggest Meme of 2015 Was Pepe the Frog". New York Magazine. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  4. Olivia Nuzzi, How Pepe the Frog Became a Nazi Trump Supporter and Alt-Right Symbol, The Daily Beast, 26 May 2016
  5. Elizabeth Chan, Donald Trump, Pepe the frog, and white supremacists: an explainer, Hillary for America, September 12, 2016
  6. Anti-Defamation League, Pepe the Frog, Hate on Display™ HATE SYMBOLS DATABASE
  7. http://edition.cnn.com/2016/10/18/us/save-pepe-the-frog-trnd/ #SavePepe: Campaign aims to reclaim Internet frog from hate groups (retrieved November 4, 2016)
  8. Pepe the Frog creator kills off internet meme co-opted by white supremacists
  9. Pepe the frog rises from the dead, creator says
  10. Useful travel fact — the word "kuk" literally means rooster "cock" in Swedish.
  11. Cult of Kek, Know Your Meme
  12. See the Wikipedia article on Parody religion. Archive.
  13. http://www.xenosystems.net/kek/
  14. Pepe, Kek, and the Rise of an Elder God
  15. Angel L. Martinez Cantera (August 14, 2014). "This Restaurant Is Nostalgic for Fascist Spain". Vice News.