Information icon.svg

Campaigning for the RationalMedia Foundation 2021 board of trustees election is underway!

People Power Party

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Logo of the People Power Party

People Power Party (국민의힘, Gugmin-Uihim) or United Future Party (미래통합당, 未來統合黨, Milaetonghabdang) is a right-wing, social conservative and anti-communist party in South Korea. It was created as a merger of several hard-line conservative, anti-communist right-wing parties, including Liberty Korea Party (자유한국당, 自由韓國黨), New Conservatives (새로운보수당, 새로운保守黨) and Onward for Future 4.0 (미래를향한전진4.0, 未來를향한前進4.0).

Political position[edit]

Officially, it calls for "moderate conservatism" (중도보수, 中道保守). In reality, its leadership is made up of traditionalists and older people, and its supporters made up of alt-right young people.

The absolute majority of party members refuse to recognize the existence of LGBT. There was a debate between this party and the more moderate Democratic Party of Korea on whether acceptance of gay people should be either opposed or require a national consensus, which both candidates drew a lot of fire from social media.[1]

It is difficult to characterize a tendency as a big tent party, but it is actually a hard-line conservative party that is far from a "moderate conservative."

Diplomatically, People Power Party has a strong pro-U.S. and anti-PRC tendency. The position on Russia is not clear. (However, they are less friendly to Russia than to the Minjoo Party because of their traditional anti-North Korea tendencies.)

Conservatives in South Korea are pro-business, but unlike conservatives in the United States, they have supported economic intervention rather than fiscal conservatism. But conservatives in South Korea always have a more hostile view of welfare and labor than conservatives in the United States. (see South Korea#Poor welfare and labor right)

In 2021, Lee Jun-seok(이준석), a young "moderate conservative", was elected as the leader of the PPP party. The problem is that this moderation is more of an alt-lite line that is "moderate" in South Korean political standards and not "moderate" at all in U.S. political standards. Lee Jun-seok is classified as a 'centrist' because he conflicts with the conservatism of the elderly in South Korea, but he is also notorious as an anti-feminist.[2] In addition, during his BMP years, he made extreme claims that "the Women's Committee, the Youth Committee, and the Disabled Committee should all be dissolved."[3] Lee, in particular, has put forward a radical policy of abolishing all affirmative action within the PPP.[4] Left-wing commentator Jin Joong-kwon(진중권) and conservative politician Na Kyung-won(나경원) from the PPP called Lee "like Trumpism."[5] The fucking funny thing is that Lee Jun-seok has no traditionalist tendency, so Na Kyung-won is classified as a right-wing conservative and Lee Jun-seok as a moderate conservative. This shows how extremely South Korea's conservative politics are.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]