National Bolshevism

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Modern National Bolsheviks
Frogs and swastikas
Alt-right
link=:category:
Hitler wannabes
Rebuilding racism
Buzzwords

National Bolshevism, also known as Nazbolism, is a neo-fascist and Third positionist ideology that combines wingnut and moonbat positions.[1] The origin of National Bolshevism can be traced back to the years following the Russian revolution, when nationalist groups supportive of the new communist government broke with Lenin over the "national question" and sought their own countries, or for a more Russian nationalist form of socialism. It was also briefly popular in Germany in the 1920s; its German supporters identified with the USSR because of their opposition to western liberalism and capitalism.[2]

National Bolshevik Party[edit]

Flag of the National Bolshevik Party

The modern National Bolshevik Party (Russian: Национал-большевистская партия) came about in the aftermath of the collapse of the USSR. It operated from 1993 to 2007 as a Russian political party with a political program of National Bolshevism. Although it was never officially registered. Originally formed by Aleksander Dugin and Eduard Limonov,Wikipedia's W.svg the party combined traditional Bolshevik ideology with radical nationalism, and adopted neo-nazi symbolism. This includes their logo, a hammer and sickle on a flag similar to that of Nazi Germany.[3]

By 2007, the Russian government had banned the party, though by this point the party had already split into two groups. Supporters of Liminov founded the The Other Russia (party),Wikipedia's W.svg which followed a more traditional Leninist model and endorsed direct democracy and anti-fascism. Followers of the more right-wing Dugin created the National Bolshevik Front and embraced anti-semitism, ultra-conservatism and fascism as its primary ideological goals. Many Nabols defected to mainstream Russian nationalist parties.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. See the Wikipedia article on National Bolshevism.
  2. Ernst Jünger and National Bolshevism, Louis Dupeux, Magazine littéraire n°130, November 1977, reprinted on Niekisch Translation Project online, September 28, 2017.
  3. See the Wikipedia article on National Bolshevik Party.