RationalWiki's 2019 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff – we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone who saw this today donated $5, we would meet our goal for 2020.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $2200Goal: $3000

Bo Winegard

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Bo Winegard
The colorful pseudoscience
Racialism
Icon race.svg
Hating thy neighbour
Divide and conquer
Dog-whistlers
Somebody needs to create the right-wing alternative to Rage Against the Machine, a band that rages about order and disciplined markets and Edmund Burke. That would be truly alternative and unique. And the band wouldn’t be making millions while calling for the Marxist revolution.
—Bo Winegard[1]

Bo Winegard is an American hereditarian[2] psychologist and pseudoscience promoter associated with the online "race realist" community. He writes racist bullshit for the right-wing online magazine Quillette[3][4][5] and surrounds himself with white nationalists, but complains if he is labelled one.

Winegard supports "ethno-traditionalism", which is more or less white nationalism repackaged and relabelled, so he can simultaneously defend white nationalists, while denying accusations of racism. Clever guy.

He is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Marietta College.[6] Winegard believes that race is a biological reality, white people have superior IQs predominantly because of genes and that skull shapes and measurements can determine human races by continental ancestry.[5][7][8] He promoted these dubious to pseudoscientific ideas in a Quillette review with Noah Carl in June, 2019.[5][9]

Winegard spends most of his time on Twitter talking about race and the alleged evils of liberalism.[citation NOT needed] He retweets Nathan Cofnas, Charles Murray, Noah Carl, Emil Kirkegaard, James Thompson and other alt-righter "race realists". Winegard identifies as a member of the alt-center which is basically an attempt by white nationalists in the alt-right to re-brand themselves as political moderates.[10]

Winegard is a supporter of so-called scientific racism, writing "empirical facts cannot be sexist or racist".[11]

Making up his politics[edit]

Winegard regularly contradicts himself in a short space of time when questioned about his politics.

He claimed for example in June 2019 to be a political centrist and opposed to conservatism.

I generally don't share the political beliefs of conservatives, because I am too liberal on a number of issues, but I don't like progressivism either. So I float around somewhere in the center.
—Bo Winegard[12]

In August 2019, however, he described himself as a conservative.

Agreed as a moderate conservative.
—Bo Winegard[13]

Winegard still labels himself "alt-center". And despite his insistence he is "too liberal", most his tweets on politics (for example on immigration) are anti-liberal:

I am an immigration restrictionist in the Rich Lowry sense of the word.
—Bo Winegard[14]

Defence of Emil Kirkegaard[edit]

Winegard has supported Emil Kirkegaard, an individual who has been described as "so toxic in mainstream academia that even being associated with him can sink your career."[15] Kirkegaard is a self-described eugenicist and white nationalist who claims Western governments should be paying white people to breed more. In a bunch of tweets, Winegard originally defended Kirkegaard, claiming he has seen no evidence Kirkegaard is a racist:

I have absolutely no evidence that he is [racist]. I consider him a friendly colleague. And I like him. But you welcome to ask him his views and to assess for yourself.
—Bo Winegard[16]

The claim by Winegard he has seen no evidence Kirkegaard is a racist, is bizarre, considering Kirkegaard's Twitter feed is chock full of racism, sexism, Islamophobia, transphobia, anti-immigration (e.g. describing Muslims as "terrible immigrants to get"), alt-right memes and general white nationalist sentiments (such as wanting to increase white fertility rates). After this evidence was posted,[17] Winegard slightly tried to distance himself from Kirkegaard, now claiming he doesn't share all his views:

I think Emil is uninhibited, shall we say. I can understand if some people were offended. But, I personally generally like him as a human, although I do not agree with everything (or nearly everything) he says.
—Bo Winegard[18]
I recall the time Bo said he saw no evidence Emil Kirkegaard harbored any racist views. Then @dbweissman posted these [proof].
—Cathy Young[19]

Kirkegaard's child-rape blog post[edit]

Winegard has made an ambiguous tweet that at first was interpreted by some on Twitter as defending Kirkegaard over an extremely sickening blog post in which Kirkegaard suggested a "compromise" for paedophiles is to drug and rape-sleeping children. Instead of denouncing Kirkegaard straight away like a normal person would do, Winegard claimed Kirkegaard likely suffers from Asperger's syndrome and is on the "[autistic] spectrum", thus being insensitive, Kirkegaard didn't know how people would react to his blog post:

I've not seen or heard him advocate that since—and it's not clear how serious that post was. My suspicion is that he's on the spectrum and is unaware how people will greet his words.
—Bo Winegard[20]

Later however, after attracting criticism, Winegard said he found Kirkegaard's blog post on child-rape "abominable."[21]

Make more white babies…[edit]

Similar to Kirkegaard, Winegard sits on Twitter telling white people to breed more:

If we owe the future a decent planet, don't we also owe it more children? So many people have been terrified into believing that more children will destroy the planet. But the opposite is likely true: When the population shrinks, it leads to many deleterious outcomes.
—Bo Winegard[22]

Winegard clarifies his above comment and concern is specifically only countries below sub-replacement fertility (2.1 TFR), meaning (excluding a few countries in East Asia i.e. Japan, Singapore and Korea), the whole of Europe.[23] This a key obsession of white nationalists including Brenton Harrison Tarrant the perpetrator of the Christchurch terrorist attacks, whose manifesto called for white Europeans to increase their fertility rates above 2.1.

Ethno-traditionalism[edit]

Winegard has defended white nationalism, albeit under a different name:

There are people who are what Eric Kaufmann calls ethno-traditionalists who fear rapid demographic change. I don't think it's useful or morally laudable to call them racists or white nationalists.
—Bo Winegard[24]

Note what Winegard calls "ethno-traditionalists" are virtually indistinguishable to white nationalists.

After receiving criticism and being described as a white nationalist, Winegard further repackaged his ethno-traditionalism:

I made cultural nationalism because it sounds better than ethno-traditionalism
—Bo Winegard[25]
1/ Thread. In defense of cultural nationalism. Nationalism is a divisive topic. Many progressives view it as a moral failure, a lapse into atavism that we should strive to overcome. I disagree. Here's why.
—Bo Winegard[26]

Re-labelling and repackaging white nationalism as "cultural nationalism" is a popular strategy among white nationalists; this was achieved by the British National Party as an electoral strategy to win votes in the late 2000s.

Human Biological and Psychological Diversity[edit]

Winegard with two other co-authors, including his brother, Benjamin Winegard, published a peer-reviewed paper titled "Human Biological and Psychological Diversity" defending race in Evolutionary Psychological Science.[27] The article section "Race and Human Populations" is rebutted below.

Winegard et al. 2017Rebuttal
The same basic principles apply to humans. Evidence from a variety of disciplines, including genetics, anthropology, archaeology, and paleontology, indicates that human populations evolved distinctive features after spreading from Africa and settling in different ecological and climatic niches (Bellwood 2013; Cavalli-Sforza et al. 1994; Molnar 2006; Wade 2014). Although such human biological variation is often ignored by social scientists, it is not really a matter of dispute among researchers in the relevant disciplines.One would have to ask what any of this has to do with race. The fact there are different human populations with "distinctive features" (in terms of disparate frequency e.g. population x has >70% blue coloured eyes, but population y, <1%) has never been denied by anyone; in terms of genetics, see ancestry-informative markerWikipedia's W.svg. As was noted by a biological anthropologist decades ago: "There are undoubtedly no two genetically identical populations in the world; this has nothing to do directly with the validity of race as a taxonomic device."[28]

And because human populations do vary, they can be clustered and classified. The construct of race allows researchers to do this.Curiously at least one source Winegard et al. quote disagrees, see above (meaning they probably never even read the literature they cited); Cavalli-Sforza et al. (1994) The History and Geography of Human Genes reject clustering populations into large race groupings e.g. "The classification into races has proved to be a futile exercise" (p. 19); the eminent population geneticist Luigi Cavalli-Sforza was an outspoken critic of race.

One can begin with broad, continentally based categories: Caucasians, East Asians, Africans, Native Americans, and Australian Aborigines (Wade 2014). They are broad, general categories, but they have some predictive value. Importantly, there is nothing real in some metaphysical sense about this categorization. It is simply a pragmatic classification system that captures some differences in the world and allows researchers better to make sense of the pattern of human variation (Wade 2014).Winegard et al. don't provide a single example of a broad continental race category being useful to a field of science or having some predictive value. This is because continents are too diverse e.g. "If you're doing a DNA study to look for markers for a particular disease, you can't use 'Caucasians' as a group. They're too diverse."[29] Similarly, Tishkoff & Kidd (2004) warn: "it is imperative to move away from describing populations according to racial classifications such as 'black', 'white' or 'Asian'… there can be considerable genetic heterogeneity within a region, it is most useful to be as specific as possible about geographic origins, ethnicity or tribal affiliation."[30]

See also[edit]

External link[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Somebody needs to create the right-wing alternative to Rage Against the Machine, a band that rages about order and disciplined markets and Edmund Burke. That would be truly alternative and unique. And the band wouldn’t be making millions while calling for the Marxist revolution. by Bo Winegard (5:12 AM · Aug 14, 2019) Twitter (archived from August 19, 2019).
  2. Quillette Podcast 19 – Assistant Psychology Professor Bo Winegard on Hereditarianism, Centrism and the Great Awokening. Quillette. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  3. Bo Winegard. Quillette, Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  4. Bo Winegard and Ben Winegard. Quillette. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 When Quillette’s Latest Attempt to Legitimise Race Science Met Actual Scientists. Uncommon Ground. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  6. Bo Winegard. Marietta College. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  7. Noah Carl and Bo Winegard in Quillette in 2019 folks - whites have superior IQs and can be distinguished by *skull measurements* I wonder why they fixate on heritable 'white' (superior) difference? 3rd pic - a Quillette reader comment. Let's get real about this project please. by Bo Winegard (2:51 AM - 5 Jun 2019) Twitter (archived from June 5, 2019).
  8. 1/ Do you dispute the overwhelming evidence from forensic anthropology @dylanmatt? This appears an attempt to besmirch Quillette by making a vaguely true but misleading claim. First, it was an article. Not articles : )] by Bo Winegard (5:44 PM - 9 Aug 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  9. Superior: The Return of Race Science—A Review. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  10. I am definitely a member of the alt-center by Bo Winegard (9:59 AM - 26 Aug 2017) Twitter (archived from May 24, 2019).
  11. The terms "scientific sexism" and "scientific racism" are profoundly misleading. Empirical facts cannot be sexist or racist. It's important to separate real racism and real sexism from perfectly legitimate scientific hypotheses. by Bo Winegard (6:48 AM - 4 Jun 2019) Twitter (archived from August 19, 2019).
  12. 10. I generally don't share the political beliefs of conservatives, because I am too liberal on a number of issues, but I don't like progressivism either. So I float around somewhere in the center. by Bo Winegard (1:27 PM - 8 Jun 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  13. Agreed as a moderate conservative 😃 by Bo Winegard (2:05 AM - 19 Aug 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  14. https://twitter.com/EPoe187/status/1137454694652157958
  15. https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=128225
  16. I have absolutely no evidence that he is. I consider him a friendly colleague. And I like him. But you welcome to ask him his views and to assess for yourself. by Bo Winegard (10:11 AM - 8 May 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  17. i think this one actually counts as anti-racist by his standards by Daniel Weissman (4:51 PM - 11 May 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2109).
  18. I would not have posted them. I think Emil is uninhibited, shall we say. I can understand if some people were offended. But, I personally generally like him as a human, although I do not agree with everything (or nearly everything) he says. by Bo Winegard (2:08 PM - 8 Jun 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  19. There is some naiveté on this among well-meaning people. I recall the time Bo said he saw no evidence Emil Kirkegaard harbored any racist views. Then @dbweissman posted these https://twitter.com/dbweissman/status/1127360415699218440 … https://twitter.com/dbweissman/status/1127366315990237185 … by Cathy Young (2:52 PM - 6 Jun 2019) Twitter (archived from August 20, 2019).
  20. I've not seen or heard him advocate that since—and it's not clear how serious that post was. My suspicion is that he's on the spectrum and is unaware how people will greet his words. by Bo Winegard (7:12 AM - 11 May 2019) Twitter (archived from May 29, 2019).
  21. Nevertheless, I’m happy to condemn that as a policy. It is obviously abominable. I don't think that it makes Emil abominable, assuming he’s not forcefully advocating such a position. And I have no evidence that he is. by Bo Winegard (7:13 AM - 11 May 2019) Twitter (archived from May 29, 2019).
  22. Ha! Well, at least replacement level fertility would probably be good, but I've read some reasonable criticisms of this idea, so I'm working through the literature in my free time. by Bo Winegard (8:29 AM - 7 Aug 2019) Twitter (archived from May 29, 2019).
  23. No, I think that is correct. But it's driven mostly by specific spots on the planet (mostly around the tropics). In Europe and much of Eastern Asia, fertility is below replacement (which is, I think, 2.1 births). by Bo Winegard (06:54 - 6 Aug 2019) Twitter (archived from May 29, 2019).
  24. There are people who are what Eric Kaufmann calls ethno-traditionalists who fear rapid demographic change. I don't think it's useful or morally laudable to call them racists or white nationalists. by Bo Winegard (12:10 PM - 14 Aug 2019) Twitter (archived from May 29, 2019).
  25. https://twitter.com/EPoe187/status/1164193019584757760
  26. https://twitter.com/EPoe187/status/1164175662313349121
  27. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312500015_Human_Biological_and_Psychological_Diversity
  28. Geographic and Microgeographic Races by Marshall T. Newman. Current Anthropology, Vol. 4, No. 2 (Apr., 1963), pp. 189-207. (see Jean Hiernaux comments on pages 197-198).
  29. Do Races Differ? Not Really, DNA Shows Natalie (August 22, 2000) New York Times.
  30. Implications of biogeography of human populations for 'race' and medicine by Sarah A. Tishkoff & Kenneth K. Kidd, Nature Genetics 36, S21-S27 (2004). doi:10.1038/ng1438.