Richard Haier

From RationalWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The colorful pseudoscience
Race & Racialism
Icon race.svg
Hating thy neighbour
Divide and conquer
Dog-whistlers

Richard J. Haier is a psychologist and a racialist/pseudoscientist promoter who is a former president[1] of the International Society for Intelligence Research and currently Editor-in-chief of Intelligence,[2] a peer-reviewed journal that has controversially allowed proponents of hereditarianism and racialist pseudoscience to sit on its Editorial Board, as well as published papers by far-right authors, many associated with the Pioneer Fund.[3] Haier has often acted as an apologist for scientific racism[4][5] and is sometimes named as a "respectable" advocate of pseudoscientific theories of race, IQ, and genetics.[6]

Haier is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Irvine.[7] He has controversially allowed the Editorial Board of Intelligence to include Gerhard Meisenberg and Richard Lynn, both members associated with the racist pseudo-scholarly Mankind Quarterly, justifying his decision with the argument "I prefer to let the papers and the data speak for themselves."[8] However, both Meisenerg and Lynn have since been removed from the Editorial Board. In 1994, Haier was a signatory of Mainstream Science on IntelligenceWikipedia,[9] a statement which endorsed the hereditarianism worldview of The Bell Curve despite the SPLC noting that only 10/52 signatures were from psychologists who specialise in human intelligence, some not even qualified.[10]

In his book The Neuroscience of Intelligence, Haier promotes the claims that there is a real ability called "general intelligence", that compensatory education programs cannot meaningfully increase it,[11] and that it is strongly influenced by brain volume.[12] While superficially race-neutral, all of these are standard racialist claims to support the alleged genetic link between race and intelligence. The book also approvingly cites a large amount of "research" by grantees of the Pioneer Fund, including Arthur Jensen, Linda Gottfredson, and Thomas Bouchard.[13] Rather than explicitly advocating a racial hierarchy of intelligence with blacks at the bottom like Lynn or Emil Kirkegaard, Haier's book takes the more subtle approach of presenting various indirect arguments to support such a hierarchy, so that readers (his audience being "human-biodiversity" proponents) can infer the (implied) conclusion.

On Twitter, Haier has defended The Bell Curve[14] and regularly retweets material posted by Charles Murray,[15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22] considered a white nationalist by the SPLC.[23] Despite not personally attending the London Conference on Intelligence, he has shared a pro-eugenics, pro-Pioneer Fund article defending the conference.[24] He has published controversial articles defending the book The Bell Curve in the right-wing online magazine Quillette.[25]

Haier has distanced himself from some far-right extremists and racists, for example in 2022 he agreed to ban Emil O. W. Kirkegaard from speaking at ISIR conferences.[26]

References[edit]