RationalWiki's 2019 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff – we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone who saw this today donated $5, we would meet our goal for 2019.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3220Goal: $6000

Terrorism-baiting

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
It doesn't stop
at the water's edge

Politics
Icon politics.svg
Theory
Practice
Philosophies
Terms
As usual
Country sections
Flag of the United States.svg
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg

Terrorism-baiting is a neologism, coined as a parallel to Red-baiting, referring to the practice of trying to discredit critics of the United States' current Middle Eastern foreign policy by falsely asserting that the critics are in league with, duped by, or otherwise sympathetic to terrorists. As with Red-baiting, the term can be used fallaciously, when used with regard to actual terrorist sympathizers such as Ward Churchill, Fahad Hashmi, or Anjem Choudary of Islam4UK.

Terrorism-baiting is largely performed by right-wing elected officials[1] and spokespeople for conservative groups, which means that the targets of it are mostly those who are disfavored of the right-wing, specifically leftists and Muslims.

Examples of terrorism-baiting are:

  • Representative Chip Cravaack's (R-MN) denouncing the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) as a terrorist group during the March 2011 hearings held by known sympathizer of the terrorist Provisional Irish Republican Army, Representative Peter King (R-NY,[2] on the 'radicalization' of American Muslims.[3]
  • Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens’s May 24, 2011 accusation that the Georgia State Progressive Student Alliance was being manipulated by terrorists when it made a public records request for information about Georgia State University’s Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange (GILEE) program.[4][5]
  • Green-baiting can sometimes involve terrorism-baiting as environmental advocates are often portrayed as members of ecoterrorist organizations like ALF.

External links[edit]

References[edit]