RationalWiki's 2018 Fundraiser

There is no RationalWiki without you. We are a small non-profit with no staff — we are hundreds of volunteers who document pseudoscience and crankery around the world every day. We will never allow ads because we must remain independent. We cannot rely on big donors with corresponding big agendas. We are not the largest website around, but we believe we play an important role in defending truth and objectivity.

If everyone seeing this today donates $5, we will meet our goal for 2018.

Fighting pseudoscience isn't free.
We are 100% user-supported! Help and donate $5, $20 or whatever you can today with PayPal Logo.png!

Donations so far: $3383Goal: $5000

Darwin, Then and Now, The Most Amazing Story in the History of Science

From RationalWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
The divine comedy
Creationism
Icon creationism.svg
Running gags
Jokes aside
Blooper reel

Darwin, Then and Now, The Most Amazing Story in the History of Science is an anti-evolution book written by young earth creationist Richard William Nelson and published by iUniverse in 2009.

Overview[edit]

The book is intentionally deceptive, and contains over one thousand quotations from scientists about evolution. However, Nelson has been very dishonest and moved words around and misrepresented the quotes on purpose. Nelson confuses "Darwinism" with evolution deliberately in an attempt to pretend evolution is falling apart. All of the scientists he quoted accepted the biological fact of evolution and were only debating the mechanisms which brought it about. The book is filled with dishonest quote mining and has received very negative reviews. Nelson says that he opposes evolution because it contradicts the Genesis account in the Bible.

Controversy[edit]

Nelson is an internet troll and has posted positive reviews of his book on internet forums. He created a fake user called "Kam" and pretended to be a female to give his book extra support but it was later revealed that this user was his own sockpuppet.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]